Food Miles, or ‘Fair Miles’

When you make your purchases, are you struggling over the decision to ‘shop local’ or ‘support the poor in distant lands’? If so, read this. I had been meaning to make a post on the subject of ‘Food Miles, or Fair Miles’, and finding this article from Reuters provided an ideal vehicle to do so. Please consider the following:

Read More >
2 Comments

Street Orchards for Community Security

Street Orchards for Community Security

© Brad Lancaster, www.HarvestingRainwater.com Fig. 24.The heat island effect. An excessively wide, exposed, solar-oven-like residential street in Tucson, Arizona absorbs the sun’s heat during the day like a battery, then radiates it out at night. This local warming effect has raised summer temperatures in Tucson by 6°F (3°C) since the 1940s, which contributes to global warming since the higher temperatures result in people using air conditioners more, which are powered […]

Read More >
5 Comments

Vetiver Grass – A Hedge Against Erosion

PIJ #54, March – May 1995 Soil erosion is perhaps the world’s most chronic environmental problem that is literally costing the earth. The soil it carries off now totals 20 billion tons a year and this loss is not only severely degrading the environment, it is eroding the economic viability of countries. Despite enormous effort, standard soil conservation methods have been largely unsuccessful. However, a remarkable tropical grass may hold […]

Read More >
34 Comments

BR-319 – Amazon’s Highway to Hell

An old road through central Amazonia, that became overgrown and impassable in the 1980s, may get reopened and fully paved — threatening to escalate destruction of one of the world’s last remaining stands of tropical rainforest To date, one fifth of the Amazon forest has been destroyed, that’s an area the size of France. Will it stop? It must, but will it? To stop it will require planning, foresight, and […]

Read More >
2 Comments

Skating on Thin Ice

by George Monbiot – journalist, author, academic and environmental and political activist I have spent the last two evenings skating. Last night we laid lanterns out across the ice and swooped and swung and fell flat on our faces on this silent lake in mid-Wales, for hours by moonlight. I should have been in bed – I have a chest infection and a cold – but I wouldn’t have missed […]

Read More >
0 Comment

Phosphorus Matters

Part One: Closing the Phosphorus Cycle Phosphate mine on Nauru island. Currently part of it is reforested. Photo: Jon Harald Søby It might sound ridiculous, but for every container of bananas, coffee, tea or cocoa imported, we should send back a shipment of a fluffy, earth-like smelling compost. Why is that? With each container of food we import nutrients taken up by plants from the soil. We import calcium, potassium, […]

Read More >
7 Comments

The Crash Course

I’ve referenced Chris Martenson’s excellent ‘Crash Course’ a couple of times, but now I’ve discovered Chris has also uploaded it to YouTube, so can embed here for your convenience and viewing pleasure. For those not familiar, this twenty chapter presentation is arguably the best effort I’ve seen to help people understand our current world predicament, with an emphasis on economics. It’s a must watch (in addition to ‘Money as Debt‘). […]

Read More >
5 Comments

Greenhouse Effect

As The world warms, the dry areas of the globe are growing even drier. in Jordan, some villages are already working on what to do when the rain stops coming. Words by Allison Ford. Photography by Josh Estey/CARE. Originally published in Jo Magazine. The last time rain fell in Bayoudeh was February 10. The land has only gotten dryer since then. People in and out of Jordan like to talk […]

Read More >
0 Comment

Please Help the Palestinian People in a Time of Tragedy

The Jordan Valley Project site is the triangular section in foreground As Israeli attacks on the Gaza Strip escalate, more and more Palestinian civilians are being displaced by damage or destruction to their homes. The need for refugee shelter has become critical. Geoff and Nadia Lawton are currently working on a PRI project in a Palestinian refugee village in Jordan. The project, known as the Jordan Valley Permaculture Project, is […]

Read More >
6 Comments

Money as Debt

Many of us are watching the current economic crisis with great interest (albeit with a lot of concern). A lot of us could also see it coming. Our modern economic systems are ultimately inviable, based on ever increasing debt and ever enlarging boom and bust cycles. Systemic economic collapse is inevitable, and painful (indeed, disastrous) though it may be, in many ways the sooner it happens the better it will […]

Read More >
7 Comments

PRI Site Info Session at Zaytuna Farm

Geoff and Nadia Lawton have been running highly successful courses at Zaytuna Farm in Northern NSW, Australia, for a few years now. Now, with the pressing need to ramp up the pace of Permaculture education to try to help steer this misguided world onto something resembling a sane path, we’re now working towards improving and enlarging the PRI infrastructure and facilities. Click the image below for a larger view with […]

Read More >
1 Comment

The Bigger They Are…

The arse falls out of the Chinese recycling industry, causing hardship to millions and stalling one of the few large scale attempts to limit the damage we’re doing. Of course we should repair, re-use and recycle wherever possible – that should go without saying – but this stuff is travelling thousands of miles to seek out cheap labour, and is still inextricably tied in to high levels of consumption – […]

Read More >
0 Comment