Permalot in Czech Republic

Over the hills, through the woods, and at the end of a dead-end road; that’s where you’ll find the little Hamlet of Bouzov Svojanov; a 600 year old village with a present-day population of only 20 people. It is also here that you will find our ecovillage initiative where we seek to create a model for rural sustainability and in doing so seek to return life to a village almost […]

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IDEP newsletter – One year after the Tsunami

It has been just over one year since the devastating Asian Tsunami changed the region forever. Since then there have been so many other tragedies in the region and worldwide. IDEP extends its heartfelt sympathies to all those that have suffered so greatly. We also extend our best wishes to the thousands of people all over the world that like us continue to work tirelessly to try and bring some […]

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Permaculture Research Institute news from the front

The last six months of 2005 were very busy for The Permaculture Research Institute, with activities in diverse locations around the world. Nadia and Geoff Lawton flew to Jordan early in August 2005 for six weeks of work on permaculture projects in the Dead Sea Valley. The demonstration farm and the numerous village home gardens involved in PRI’s on-ground funding scheme were looking strong and secure especially considering the mid-summer […]

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Backyard Aquaponics

This just in, from Christopher Nesbitt: “Backyard Aquaponics” is a new book by Joel Malcolm, an innovator in Perth, Australia and is well worth a look. Aquaponics is a very simple and efficient system involving aquaculture and hydroponics. The system is dependent on plants in grow beds, generally pea gravel, being used to filter out fish manure and other material while aerating the water to maintain oxygen levels. Joel’s book […]

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Isabell Shipard’s new book is out

“How can I grow and use sprouts as living food?” Isabell Shipard’s new book. Sprouts provide quality nutrients and, by weight, are the richest source of vitamins, minerals and anti-oxidants of all fresh food; in fact, they have a much greater nutrient content than the original seed. Sprouts are fast growing and very econonical. Sprouts help to alkalise the body, clear acid, toxic wastes and enable the body to heal […]

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James in India

I am now into the second leg of my trip to India – I have been with Beth for the last 10 days which is great and we are both back in Jamkhed, Maharashtra teaching on a primary healthcare course (same as the one earlier this year). My six weeks with the GREEN Foundation was fantastic. The organisation is what I expected and more. Their programs have worked very hard […]

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Geoff Lawton’s Resume

Geoff Lawton’s Resume

Permaculture Teacher, Consultant and Designer. Geoff Lawton, 2013 All photographs © PRI Received Diploma of Permaculture Design in 1995 in: Education, Design, Implementation, System Establishment, Administration and Community Development, from The Permaculture Institute of Australia.

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Permaculture house & land for the Jordan Valley

At 400 meters below sea level, the Jordan Valley is the lowest piece of land in the world. Its climate is very dry with an average rainfall of 150 millimeters a year, most of which comes in 2 or 3 mid-winter events. Summers are very hot with day time temperatures often reaching 50 centigrade with hot nights often over 25 centigrade. Winters are warm with no frost. To achieve a […]

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Fast compost – Soil Permaculture Design and Maintenance

What is Compost? Compost is humanity’s version of the humus found in nature, and the compost heap is a ‘digester’ – our tool used to produce it. Humus is made of broken down vegetation which releases nutrients back into the soil for healthy plant growth. Similarly, under the direction of the careful gardener, the composting process breaks down a rich mixture of ingredients to produce a potent humus which will […]

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Alley cropping in the tropics

The problem of compaction within annual crop systems is a very difficult one in the tropics especially. The tropics make it difficult because they naturally lend themselves to diverse productive tree systems and often people have followed the annual cropping systems of European style of cultivation. Ok so incorporating trees in the systems will help and mulching definitely will help and limiting the amount of walking on the fields will […]

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The Bottom of the Barrel

The world is quickly running out of oil – so why do politicians refuse to talk about this huge problem? George Monbiot The oil industry is buzzing. In November the government approved the development of the biggest deposit discovered in British territory for at least 10 years. Everywhere we are told that this is a “huge” find, which dispels the idea that North Sea oil is in terminal decline. You […]

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July 2005 newsletter

Greetings and welcome to The Permaculture Research Institute Newsletter for June 2005. Griffith University in Brisbane was the venue for the final Permaculture Design Certificate course taught by the permaculture research institute in November 2004. This was the first course for us to be taught in an Australian University and was co-taught by Geoff and Danial Lawton. Students attended from most states of Australia with a few coming in from […]

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