Turn Your Sink and Shower Water into an Abundant Oasis

Chances are that you have probably heard of the importance of conserving water. Dozens of governmental and non-governmental organizations have orchestrated campaigns trying to convince the average person to reduce the amount of water that they use. From high-efficiency laundry machines to shower heads that are in line with the current national energy policy act standard, most advocacy for conserving household water use focuses on having us use less water. […]

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When Re-Using Isn’t the Answer

In an effort to cut down on waste, a common practice has been to re-use water bottles. While some people re-use the plastic bottles that are meant for one use, others invest in bulkier bottles made of stainless steel or glass for better quality. While re-using your water bottle rather than needing a few a day is better for the environment, is it really okay for your health? The answer […]

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How Much Can Plants Hear?

Plants may possess more complex senses than previously thought, according to a new study led by the University of Western Australia that has revealed that plants have the ability to both detect and respond to sound. Talking to plants has always been fairly common practice among many aboriginal tribes – and to this day, the most devoted gardeners will claim that playing classical music or providing words of positive reinforcement […]

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Productivity in the Temperate Understory

I started my permaculture journey in Central America. I was introduced to the term in Nicaragua. I spent time with it in Panama, Guatemala, and Belize. Then, I learned more in Colombia and southern Spain, Andalucía. What I’d never done until recently is spent much time—at least not with regards to permaculture—in cool temperate setting. Now, I’m in North Carolina, reimagining much of what I know and learning new plants […]

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The Importance of Developing a Sense of Territory

One of the defining aspects of indigenous cultures around their world is their connection to specific territories where they have lived for hundreds and thousands of years. Compared to modern-day western societies which are more defined by migrations and mobility, indigenous cultures have their lives and livelihoods demarcated by the specific conditions and context of their places. While these sorts of territorial limitations may seem to us westerners as undesirable […]

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Urban Sprawl and the Danger of the Loss of Wild Spaces

As ever larger portions of our world’s population move into cities, the growth of these cities and the resources they demand create more and more strains on local ecosystems. While urban spaces certainly do to offer a number of opportunities for many people, they don’t come without their costs. Very rarely have we collectively stopped to consider what our increasing urban identity means to our long-term survival and to the […]

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Celtuce or Stem Lettuce

Celtuce goes by many different names including Stem Lettuce, Chinese Lettuce, and Asparagus Lettuce. Celtuce (Lactuca sativa var. augustana, angustata, or asparagine) is the most unique of the five lettuce varieties. Originating in the Mediterranean, like most lettuces, it then arrived in China around 600 A.D., making its way to the western world in the 19th century. Not Like the Others What makes Celtuce so unique is that, unlike the […]

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Top Soil: A Catalyst for Better Health and Nutrition

Where We Stand Without Soil Everything begins and ends with the soil. Unfortunately, close to 70% of it has been lost since the dawn of the agricultural revolution. Since the onset of the Green Revolution only half a decade ago, we´re getting rid of it faster than ever. Besides the ecocide that the loss of topsoil entails, it also is a major threat to our health. Most foods grown by […]

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Has Pollution Taken Over the Earth?

Air pollution has become a very controversial and urgent topic in the past few decades. What we know now is that indoor air pollution and outdoor air pollution is dangerous and extremely hard to reverse. It has the potential to destroy the natural environment and cause harm to humans, animals, and food crops. Pollution is produced through both manufactured activity and organic processes. According to the 2014 WHO report, air […]

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The Local Food Movement as A Catalyst for Community

In the last couple of decades, the local food movement has gone from a fringe movement to a major player the national food industry. Almost every major urban center around the country has several farmers markets, community supported agricultural programs and other innovative ways to bring farmers and consumers closer together. The local food movement improves access to healthy, organic food, strengthens the local economy, and improves community relationships. What […]

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Continued Climate Change May Disrupt Ocean Currents

Climate change is giving us more to worry about than just rising seas, scientists claim. Greenland’s glaciers are melting fast, pouring ice into the Arctic Ocean – and according to a new study, this influx of freshwater from the melting ice could lead to a disruption of a major ocean current system. The consequence of this disruption could be devastating, drying out the narrow section of land from Mauritania to […]

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The Health Benefits of Growing and Eating Turmeric

Turmeric is a root that grows well in tropical climates and is the main ingredient in the Indian spice curry. What few people know is that turmeric is also one of the best all-around natural medicines that can be found. Turmeric can be used topically for skin related health issues or ingested for a wide array of internal health problems. You can also grow your own turmeric in containers in […]

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