Re-Designing Refugee Communities, Settlement Design, Large Community Site Design

Discussion in 'The big picture' started by Marcus Busby, Sep 19, 2015.

  1. Marcus Busby

    Marcus Busby Junior Member

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    The presentation was in German, having not spoken German since school, Melda Akbas from Global Shapers Berlin kindly volunteered to translate the general concepts of conversation for me. Melda provoded a very thorough and detailed interpretation and I apologise for the briefness of my notes, and any inaccuracies in my interpretation of what was said.

    Notes from Expert Panel Presentation - MoreThanShelters - Daniel Kerber

    Presentation had four main areas, followed by question and discussion
    • MoreThanShelters
      1. Ecosystem Design
      2. Social Design
      3. Product Design
    • Chellenges holding back Scaling-up
    • Opportunities for Scaling-up
    • Connections and Support Offered
    More Than Shelters
    I pasted the information in the previous post so that anybody reading can go directly to the MTS(morethanshelters) website to be certain they can find accurate information.

    Daniel Kerber gave a brief overview of the MTS project, how and where MTS work, what they can offer, what kind of support is needed, and people and organisations they are looking to connect with in order to scale up.

    [​IMG]

    Ecosystem Design

    It is necessary to think of camp as a complex living system, we must think of camps differently in order to design, it is not simply 80,000 people all living in the same spot.

    We are approaching Tempelhof, Berlin (see Map and a recent Article) using an integrated planning approach, these are not just people lliving together, in a place, but we must appreciate any community is an integrated ecosystem.

    Social Design

    It's important to understand the effects architecture can have on people. The dangers and also the benefits. Social Design means doing something together, it is a relationship. Perhaps a person is an architect, they must design WITH, no simply FOR people or a community. This is something we have realised, have experience in from working in these refugee situations; the great importance of - designing 'Spaces' and 'Space Creation' together.

    Product Design

    [​IMG]

    Photo of MoreThanShelters Domo at Hello Festival by Fiona K
    ‏@fijinsky
    Image source: https://twitter.com/fijinsky/status/710958062853595137
    See tweets from HelloFestival by searching #hellofestival

    Product Design notes from presentation continued..

    The Domo is not just a tent, it is a product designed by listening to refugees and their needs.
    It is designed to to be flexible and adaptable in size and application, designed for refugee camp scenario.

    Domo is adaptable and modular, Domos can link together to create multi-room buildings 'Domo Pools', therefore adapted to different needs.

    [​IMG]
    Image : Modular Domo Pool

    The Domo modules have been very successful in Hamburg (see here, here, here and here) to create space for children and women. Particularly for breast-feeding areas, and quiet space.

    MoreThankShelters have been actively involved in Germany, Greece, Nepal and Jordan. Daniel showed photographs from these projects.

    Providing comfortable, and peaceful areas with privacy for women and children.
    Peaceful areas are in short supply in refugee camp scenarios.

    Any social space is in short supply in refugee camp areas, making it essential to create them. Social spaces are essential for every community.

    Daniel showed some images from the projects underway in the Tempelhof airport hangar.

    Often in these huge warehouses or buildings which have been allocated for shelter for new-comers, there is just a large expanse of space and the people arrive. So we have the people there, and the space, but no privacy. The next step is organising the space, to build privacy and organising the people. There can be 40 persons in an area 150m2 (1600 sq ft). We designed living spaces and then moveable walls to allow it to be adaptable - to evolve.

    Daniel showed photographs from Zaatari in Jordan where he worked with Kilian Kleinschmidt (director of Zaatari at the time) and said MoreThanShelters is a small company, it is important to work with stakeholders, to use these concepts and to reproduce them as proven models, where we can help you build together.

    We have been developing ways to build space - create space, how to use it, to optimise it, we give and receive advice and we are also advised by people living there - we have to build networks in the community for the product design, and build networks outside the camp, share advice and experience to build networks for creating products, delivering, scaling up and delivering the needs.

    By listening to the needs of the refugees in Hamburg and having the modular Domo, we created a breast-feeding hall, now this 'space' is being implemented in the other camps in Greece for example.

    At Tempelhof (Berlin), we gave advice for interior space creation, as mentioned above, we research people's use of the space in order to create the product, it is vital to listen to the people/community and design accordingly.
     
    Last edited: Apr 8, 2016
  2. Marcus Busby

    Marcus Busby Junior Member

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    Notes from HelloFestival Expert Panel Presentation - MoreThanShelters - Daniel Kerber continued...

    Questions and discussions


    Question from participant/audience -
    "What is the lifespan expected for Temelhof - Zaatari is 20+ years, will people have to stay there for 20+ years?"

    In Germany it is different, also politically different. There are methods developed for the EU area, and we can have the same learning effect or learning approach, to develop transferable methods that can work in Germany and also in Syria for example. Tempelhof is just one approach taken - with the available building - a large covered area which has been adapted to provide shelter away from the elements, we have designed the privacy and movable walls...

    ...the first step is to listen and to understand and appreciate that within the refugee community there are community leaders from different ethnic and cultural groups like a village mayor, or religious leader as well as natural leaders as with any group of people and we include the natural community leaders into the decision making.

    Question from participant/audience:
    "Why are municipalities not taking steps, why is it left to others to organise tents shelters, food etc?"

    The challenges we have faced are how to get together and make contact with these people - working in the municipalities. Also the process, the system of registration etc has created a lot of work, employees, or the process has been overworked, money is not the problem. It is essential to increase visibility and communication with and between authorities and innovators.

    Its a big job to find suitable space and create/adapt those spaces (such as buildings/warehouses/land) to adapt those spaces suited to the needs of women children and men. This was challenging - to communicate with the refugees to plan and design the spaces, as it is a totally new situation for everybody, new building, new country, new cultures.. so communicating the idea of what space is needed, what sorts of spaces needed for different activities and needs to adapt the spaces that have been allocated.

    The largest challenge has been connecting with the right people in the municipalities, this was achieved usually through personal contacts and networking. It is not easy to know who is the right person or department to contact and connect with in order to facilitate the process of finding and creating spaces and communicating with the refugees there.

    Question from participant/audience:
    "How can we integrate the existing communities into the camps? - to bring people together, because when refugees arrive it does effect the living space for the existing community - naturally receiving lots of new people moving to an area quickly, it effects the living space in the borough."

    So to find ways to have a positive impact upon the borough, its environment and build new relations, lasting, acceptance and friendship

    Daniel:

    So far we have established 3 concepts which make a great impact:

    1. Silent Rooms

    for both men and women, although separate. These are intentionally closed off from the hustle and bustle of the camp, they are not part of the integration process but spaces to find reposure. These sorts of spaces are in short supply in any community, they are so important. Women can use them for breast feeding. Parents can have intimate time with their children. These quiet areas are effectively for sanctuary, reposure, comfortable safe and quiet spaces. Private but open to all. We must do this in all refugee centres - its not physics, it is very easy.

    2. Mixed Population Centres

    We are now finding lots of refugees are ready for integration with completed paperwork...

    3. Build/Create Space Outside of Shelters/Centres

    To create different opportunities for meeting. Previously inside the shelters/centres there is a limited way of meeting people, eachother and the wider community. To create spaces outside of the refugee centres where the opportunity to meet with others who are not in the camp, members of local community, opportunity to meet face-to-face, we have not done this yet... meeting spaces, convergences have great potentials..

    Question from participant/audience:
    "The refugee centres and camps around the world are emergency, temporary situations.. how do we mitigate or protect against them becoming long-term?"

    So it is also important to think about 'Exit Strategies.' The places must be good enough to house people and be dignified, but not so good to become a home. Each refugee shelter, centre or camp has a life cycle, we must be sure not to employ them differently as mechanisms, but to ensure we are using them (each of the options) properly and appropriately.

    This is why the DOMO has been so useful, because it is fleible and adpatable to different scenarios. Every component is replaceable and all the materials are recyclable (cradle-to-cradle/circular economy design) so it is durable in robustness, but also durable economically as it can be maintained and re-used many times.

    It is easy to transport, it packs down very small into a bag and can create social spaces of many different formats and sizes.

    For example, in Idomeni, a pool of DOMOs has just been dispatched to this emergency situation to provide clean, safe breast feeding areas, funded by crowdfunding campaign via betterplace.org

    (see also this tweet: https://twitter.com/morethsh/status/710196781431267329)
     
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2016
  3. Marcus Busby

    Marcus Busby Junior Member

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    Notes from HelloFestival Expert Panel Presentation - MoreThanShelters - Daniel Kerber continued...

    Questions and discussions continued...


    Question from participant/audience:
    The German State, all states, look for normalisation as soon as possible - for integration into the work market, is this situation different?

    Nobody wants tents everywhere, or people living in tents all over the place, this is why we have to create methods and view these challenges as design opportunities - to improve the situation for everybody affected.

    What DOMO does is, is create social space - it is designed for this - the modularity is expandable, it's very adaptable and that is why it has been so sought after as a design solution for refugee camp and shelter situations, but MoreThanShelters does not just supply tents, we have direct experience in the creation of inclusive living spaces.

    Question/Comment from participant/audience:
    So is it just about creating new space - Or about building new space / old space better?

    All cities are different. Berlin for example has many old Gymnasium, warehouses or large industrial buildings, which can be converted, whereas somewhere in Bavaria for example, it may be that empty houses are used and converted.

    So yes, its using old spaces and creating new spaces, but with the best utilsation/optimality of 'space'.

    This is a key problem - that there is a deprivation of social space. Its true in many communities not only refugee shelters, but towns and villages too.

    Refugees are ready to work, live and play - like all of us - it is possible to make the mistake to think refugees are "needy" or need help, but they are, often just like us - independent, capable people.. so not so much "needy."

    The main challenge we have is approaching municipalities - to work with them

    Comment from participant/audience working with a German Municipality:

    Working in the Municipality, the pressure has been very high, such a short timespan, to allocate people and sometimes we dont't know where - as one place gets filled up. We just know that a certain number of people are coming, but we dont know until they arrive if they are children, women, men, we dont know how many of each are arriving and this makes planning where people go more difficult - the challenge has been knowing where to put people when they arrive and not having any pre-notification.

    Request for thoughts about Scaling Up, and Collaboration/Support from others.

    Architect offered design assistance with modular housing
    Property developer offered help with identifying and developing land and importance of social spaces
    Various NGOs offered support
    Others
     
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2016
  4. Marcus Busby

    Marcus Busby Junior Member

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    Ecosystem Design using Pattern Language
    -Using forest ecology as analogy to define ecosystem planning for settlement design / urban planning

    Due to very limited computer access time, these notes will be brief.

    Ecosystem Design for Community Settlement Planning

    It is possible to look at (observe and study) complete functioning climax ecosystems, to identify forms and functions within this climax community:

    Forms: (plants, animals, structures - trees, rocks, fungi, microbes etc)
    Functions: (nitrogen fixers, decomposers, self-seeders, perennials, pollinators, burrowers, scavengers, predators, herbivores etc).
    e.g. Image : The form and functions of a chicken. source: http://www.fallbrookpermaculture.com/chickens/

    With this recipe of forms and functions which make up the 'dish' that is a climax ecosystem, we can see how ecosystems evolve, in a process - ecosystem processes, enabling the emergence of successive support systems (ecosystem services) which enable further, yet more complex energetic (economic) and cultivational (cultural) processes (activties) to take place.

    Using a forest ecology as an example, this is achieved through a combination of processes referred to as biological succession, leading to a state of dynamic equilibrium and therefore, self perpetuation.

    successive layers of processes and functions that facilitate the emergence of increasingly complex support systems for increasingly complex organisms to exists - from single cell, microbial, fungal, multi-cellular, vegetative and insectory to fish, reptilian and mammalian.
    The yield of an ecological system is theoretically unlimited, only limited by limiting factors, resources can be intentionally supplied by human intervention in an ecological system, simple forms of cultivation / silviculture , or positive human interventions are:

    habitat creation and restoration ecology e.g via:
    the addition/creation of soil and humus - composting, in order that plants can grow
    introducing seeds, plants, trees to speed up natural processes of migration in order to create biodiversity
    introduction of beneficial insects - pollinators and predators to improve pollination and biological pest control
    introduction of fish repltiles and animals as active agents in ecosystem processes and as support species for other organisms, including humans.

    Soil, plants, insects, trees, animals and geological features all perform ecosystic services, all form part of the support systems foir increasing complex forms and functions of a living ecological system.

    A very simplified example would be introducing soil supports plants, including planbts supports herbivores, introducing herbivores supports decomposition decomposition feeds the soil, which feeds planst which feeds herbivores...

    [​IMG]

    Thus we know by observation and understanding what/which components are present and what functions and processes exist within the ecosystem. there is no waste in nature, in natural processes from molecular to landscape or regional events, there is no waste, only change this is a law of thermodynamics.

    There are universal transferable concepts, for both form and functions.

    Universal Forest Structure
    [​IMG]
    Image Source: http://chears.org/foodforest/about/food-forests/
    Forest Gardening see a summary and Knowledgebase see also here


    In the diagram above, we can see a typical 7-layered forest system, comprised of (plant examples given for temperate climates)
    1. Climax Layer - Upper Canopy (Sweet Chestnut, Cherry, Pear, Victoria Plum)
    2. Small Tree Layer - Lower Canopy or Sub-Canopy (Hazel, Crab Apple, Fig, Medlar, - dwarfing trees)
    3. Climbers and Vines (Kiwi, Grape, Passion Fruit, Runner Beans)
    4. Shrubs, and understorey bushes (Blackcurrant, Gooseberry, Raspberry, Eleagnus)
    5. Herbaceous perenennials and annuals (Mint, Chives, Fennel, Rhubarb)
    6. Ground Cover (Strawberries, Clover, Ramsons)
    7. Root Layer - Roots and Rhizosphere ( Parsnips, Welsh Onion, Ground Nut, Garlic and Chives, Jerusalem Artichoke)
    So this structure or assembly of 'Form' is universal - common to all forest systems. We can go anywhere on the planet and find the same 7 layers (there can be more layers in more complex systems). The difference being the species which form the layers. In temperate forests we will observe one set of species, in a tropical climate a completely different pallette of plants.

    Universal Forest Functions

    [​IMG]
    Image Source: Permaculture Designers' Manual - Bill Mollison 1988 via http://www.wegrowfromhere.com/

    continued on a blog page here
     
    Last edited: Apr 12, 2016
  5. Marcus Busby

    Marcus Busby Junior Member

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    How would you go about marking out such a design?

    The GcoT model has many advantages, being easy to mark out, easily expandable – this means that a site can grow very quickly, allowing for incoming settlers. Yes it can be adapted to existing cities - as a systems model for spatio-temporal planning..

    The GcoT model can be marked out very simply, using the most fundamental tools – a rope and a pin. The pattern is achieved by marking out circles in a flower of life design, using 6-point geometry.

    All that is needed is a length of rope sufficient to extend 25m from a central point or pin, to act as a giant compass. So place a pin at the centre point, or the starting point. Extend a rope 25m from this fixed point, and mark a circle with a 25m radius, and therefore a 50m diameter. Then find North and South using a magnetic compass. Mark the points north and south on the circle, passing through the centre point. Then begin to create a flower of life pattern.



    Once a flower of life pattern emerges, the six points on each of the circles can be connected, creating a tile-work of hexagons.

    [​IMG]
    Figure 1 : Marking out a “Street”

    Each of the hexagons will have a circumradius of 25m. All the sides of the hexagons will be 25m in length, and the area of every hexagon will be 1623.8m2. This unit can be termed a “Hex” as we would call an area of land an “acre” or “hectare,” this hexagonal unit can be called a “Hex”.

    The “Hex” is the unit size which has been determined to give the appropriate level of complexity in the (re)creation of a settlement, based upon studies of existing cities, settlements and ecosystems.

    [​IMG]
    Figure 2 : The properties of a hexagon where R=25m, referred to here as an “Hex.”

    This method continues to create a tile-work of hexagons each with R=25m and each with an area of 1623.9m2 for the reason mentioned above.

    [​IMG]

    Using the Hex to construct Built Space; form and functions

    The GCoT model is comprised of a variety of units. As described above, the core unit is a “Hex.” These Hexes are used to build larger units within the system and determine their form and function.

    Larger units of built space are a “Street,” comprised of seven Hexes, a “District” comprised of seven Streets, a “Vale” comprised of seven Districts and these can form a “City” comprised of seven Vales.

    [​IMG]
    Figure 4 : Sub Units of Built Space in the GCoT Model.

    The built space units generally follow a recursive hexagonal form. The reason for this is that buildings and communities can be arranged in circles facilitating safety and interaction. There are still straight streets, and street naming and house numbering is still easily achieved.

    The model can expand further to regional and national scales, these scales can be used in economic and ecological modelling, but for the moment we will focus upon the smaller scale applications.

    So we know that a street is comprised of seven Hexes. This describes the form of a street. The function is determined by mixed-use, transit-orientated land use zoning. Every Hex within the entire settlement is given a land use designation. In the model these are indicated by colours. The table describes some broad definitions for the types of land use and activities within a given Hex. There are six colours used to define broad activities of land-use. These of course are open to discussion and development.

    [​IMG]

    So every Hex has a colour, and seven Hexes make a street. Within the model there are over 15 different types of street configurations. The images below show some of these configurations. The configurations determine the function of the street within the greater plan. As mentioned above, the street types are determined by mixed-use and transit orientation. Apologies for the hand drawn images, not having access to my papers and files and not having a computer has meant resorting to hand drawings:

    This is a selection of street types to illustrate the point:

    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]


    Using the Hex to construct Green Space form and functions

    In addition to the units which define built areas, there are also units which comprise the greenspaces. These units are also formed by using the Hex, however, the forms and functions and of course the colours within the model differ. There are six types of green space land use with allocated colours.

    In general the green spaces follow the form of a Koch Snowflake. The reason for this is based upon the permaculture principle “maximising edge.” The Koch Snowflake is unusual as a 2d shape, because it is a 2d shape which is known to have an infinite edge.

    More about this at a later date. For the moment we are focussing upon how we would mark out a street, or neighbourhood using a GCoT approach.

    Back to marking out...

    So we are using what can be referred to as 'the flower of life' pattern to mark out hexagons, which will then be given a land use typology.

    Here is an area of land marked out into hexagons (Hexes), each Hex measures R=25m and 1623.8m2 :
    [​IMG]

    On this image you can also see that travel routes have been drawn indictaed by the straight lines.

    The routes which are higher in the hierarchy of travel infrastructure, naturally require more space, thus the main route is for example 25m wide to accommodate tram/electric car, cycle and pedestrian use, this can be changed according to the specific setting and needs. Smaller routes are 15m for electric car/cycle/pedestrian and 6m for pedestrian and 'buggy'... this does not mean that transport will be installed first, just that there is provision for this... details can be discussed later, see idealised transport model. At this stage it is necessary to stay focussed on the 'marking-out' concept.

    I just took a random part of the GCoT model and chose to enlarge it to illustrate the marking out process and how the areas for the travel infrastructure can be marked out for development into the travel network.

    The area chosen was in the satellite centre sector (yellow areas in diagram below), in district 10. Sectors and their functions within the city ecosystem are described in GCoT v2.0 see page 32 for Satellite Centres

    The location of District 10 is indicated in the sector model below:
    [​IMG]

    The location within the the city-scale model, (random area chosen to illustrate the marking out process):
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Mar 23, 2016
  6. Marcus Busby

    Marcus Busby Junior Member

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    The following example can illustrate how top-down planning can be balanced with bottom-up spatial design, this ensures hetergenous and unique "places" are created, avoiding homogenous 'grand schemes.' In essence there is top down planning, but it is not restrictive, only guidelines. The emphasis is placed upon creating diversity and uniqueness, without creating inefficiency or waste, this way the complexity of an established settlement, or system, can be emulated fom the start, for it is complexity and diversity which give systems stability and resilience - as we know by ecological studies and the importance of biodiversity in the natural environment.

    [​IMG]



    [​IMG]

    The broad, or general land use types are allocated as above. These provide general planning guidelines for aprocess of participatory urban planning , where residents are actively involved in designing their street layouts, and/or neighbourhoods - please refer to links in earlier post re participatory urban planning.

    [​IMG]

    As an example, we can imagine this participatory urban planning process resulted in routes and pathways as in the image below:

    [​IMG]

    These routes and blocks then define what can later become building plots

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    The above would result in a unique spatial pattern shown below. Each shape represents a parcel of land, whilcst the straight avenues represent the travel routes. A two-way tram route has been sketched in to give an idea of scale..

    [​IMG]

    Plots can be allocated more specific landuses, and then structures and spaces designed accordingly.

    [​IMG]

    Below gives an indication of scale, with a 7-piece MTS Domo unit sketched in. This is not positioned at all, I was just interested to see the scale within this section.

    [​IMG]


    For more info on MTS Domo Modules see post #109 below

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]

    For more info on MTS Domo Modules see post #109 below
     
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  7. Marcus Busby

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  8. Marcus Busby

    Marcus Busby Junior Member

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  9. Marcus Busby

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    Article - MTS Domo Modules

    Link to article: http://www.dw.com/en/emergency-shel...they-need-long-lasting-engineering/a-17801662

    Emergency shelters should be temporary, but they need long-lasting engineering
    • Date 23.07.2014
    • Author Guy Degen, Berlin
    How can emergency shelters provide refugees with more than just a tent? A German designer has developed a shelter system that offers a flexible space and a more dignified home under canvas.

    [​IMG]
    When you think of a refugee camp, what probably comes to mind are neat rows of white tents, communal kitchens and people trying to make the best of a bad situation that's supposed to be temporary.

    The reality can be quite different.

    Refugee camps are often located in remote and difficult environments. And whether it's because of a natural disaster or conflict, displaced people may find themselves living in tents or improvised shelters for years, sometimes decades.

    "A tent is very good to deliver short term relief. It's very lightweight and can be transported to any area of the world very quickly. But then the problems start," says Daniel Kerber.

    The Berlin-based designer leads an organisation called morethanshelters.

    ....continued on website here
     
    Last edited: Apr 6, 2016
  10. Marcus Busby

    Marcus Busby Junior Member

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    A Garden City of Today - Executive Summary
    Exec Summary of collaboratively designed-and-built city-scale settlement. Holistic, collaborative approach to planning - where residents and participants design according to their needs, cultures, expectations...

    Please note this executive summary was written before the literature review was conducted, also the population figures were presented hypothetically, and the model is presented at city-scale, but can be employed at smaller scales and larger scales.

    For more info on Participatory Urban Planning see this for example, from Montreal Urban Ecology Centre. And this from Practical Action. Everything in this Garden City proposal is intended to be open to both individual and collaborative design - from homes and gardens to a neighbourhood, to designing parks, woodlands, farms etc.. as described here, and particularly this post regarding Bottom-up spatial design..

    https://de.scribd.com/doc/231268604/A-Garden-City-of-Today-Executive-Summary
     
    Last edited: Apr 7, 2016
  11. Marcus Busby

    Marcus Busby Junior Member

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    weblink : http://www.grif.umontreal.ca/pages/i-rec papers/philipams.PDF

    DESIGN OF REFUGEE SETTLEMENTS: DEVELOPING ECOLOGY-DRIVEN APPROACH

    by Philip Amstislavski

    School of Architecture, Rensselaer
    Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY


    "Field experience demonstrates that programs,
    which empower refugee populations to
    develop sustainable farming, housing, and
    energy producing practices help avoid
    expensive environmental rehabilitation projects
    and can produce local employment.
    Such programs foster feelings of self-worth among
    traumatized exiles and transform
    a chaotic settlement into a community that
    possesses knowledge and skills that will
    benefit both refugees and environment."

    (UNHCR, Environmental DemonstrationProjects, 2000).
     
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  12. Marcus Busby

    Marcus Busby Junior Member

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    Complex systems organizational map

    [​IMG]
    Hiroki Sayama, D.Sc. - Created by Hiroki Sayama, D.Sc., Collective Dynamics of Complex Systems (CoCo) Research Group at Binghamton University, State University of New York
    • CC BY-SA 3.0view terms
    • File:Complex systems organizational map.jpg
    • Created: 26 November 2010
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Complex_systems
     
  13. Marcus Busby

    Marcus Busby Junior Member

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    link to forum thread : http://www.diem25.org/forum/viewtopic.php?f=37&t=1586#p4741

    DiEM25 Forum >
    1. Home
    2. Board index
    3. DISCUSS POLICY
    4. Open Europe: Refugees, Migration & Solidarity with Others

    I propose a spatio-temporal systems model for integration planning and management

    A big part of the reason we see economic problems and unemployment in urban and rural areas, i believe is because we have not designed an environment that suits the emergent economies. the urban and rural environments we maintain are based upon antiquated models. now we know the importance of agroecology for farming and green infrastructure for our cities and settlements - all thus for ecosystem services (natural capital) which ultimately are is the foundation for every economy on the planet.

    I propose the creation of temporary to permanent, autonomous, regenerative, ecological settlements - as a new economic model, as a new social model as a new environmental model - for real regeneration - a regenerative approach to design, living and working - towards something attainable and not debt based, but based upon creating surplus of the basic needs for life - water, food, shelter - these are the foundations stones for culture, love, friendship, peace, solidarity.

    I believe this can be achieved by working together with and allowing refugees to work within the community, allowed to grow food, allow to plant seeds and trees,
    they are allowed to improve their situation, and people are allowed to support them in doing this, even join the new ecological settlement.

    I believe that people can improve their situation and surpass their situation returning to the wider economy, producing and supplying to the wider economy instead of in deficit and debt

    This can sound idealistic, or impossible, but it is very possible to do. All previous generations have achieved this.

    I propose a method and a design for creating these settlements, which can work short term or long term and even permanently in a steady state of dynamic equilibrium.

    I know this can work, for example, I have been to, and worked at, music festivals - these are temporary settlements that , emerge from nothing except an input of enthusiasm, effort, time, skills and backing.

    I have been part of a crew of builders, building the installations, we all agreed how easy it can be to go anywhere and build a village, and grow food, harness energy and so on.. we did something similar in a month, for a three day festival, 30,000 people visited, they all eat food, drink and party, then they go. Then we dismantled the village and no rubbish was left behind.

    We know projects can work at large scale - in China the Loess Plateau restoration project raised 2.5 million people out of poverty in an area the size of Belgium at a cost of $145/Hectare.

    see http://www.worldbank.org/en/news/featur ... lShare_EXT
    and

    We know this approach can work in arid areas of the world too.

    Using an ecological approach for ecological restoration - restoration agriculture, stabilisation agriculture - as a foundation for economic growth and prosperity. Good and stable Food and Water supply is the foundation to every economy, and these come from well managed and productive ecological landscape - Nature. We can do the same as Loess Valley China anywhere.

    These settlemnents can facilitate integration, and actually be creators of jobs for the wider community - building wealth and stability for the host country, if there exists unemployment, these can create employment. All that is needed is poloitical backing and progressive land owners - land owners can benefit from land value uplift which is created anytime a working population move to an area. This is proven.

    discussing aspects of the design: http://circlesdesign.blogspot.de/

    discussing refugee situation: http://permaculturenews.org/forums/inde ... ign.14340/

    Commonland Foundation : http://www.commonland.com/en

    twitter: @fractalcities

    images of the design model : https://www.flickr.com/photos/marcusbus ... 7208012937

    Description of the design in plain English : http://www.academia.edu/12257381/A_Gard ... Today_v2.0

    Video of implementation process to make an autonomous regenerative settlement :

    Practical Solutions Resources website : https://knowledgebase.permaculture.org. ... -solutions

    Rhamis Kent: Permaculture in Somalia Presentation: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Mur0Nz ... e=youtu.be


    I can describe how this works as a planning model, as an economic development model, as a restoration model... I can describe how to implement it if we find Political Support - I hope from Greece SYRIZA? or Turkey - as both are facing huge challenges at present with refugee situation.

    I look forward to discussing with you!

    With respect and peace in my heart for all
     
    Last edited: Apr 8, 2016
  14. Marcus Busby

    Marcus Busby Junior Member

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    link to website: http://ec.europa.eu/growth/industry/innovation/policy/social/competition/

    European Social Innovation Competition
    The 2016 Social Innovation Competition focuses on social innovation for refugees and migrants. The call for entries closed on 8 April 2016. The semi-finalists of the competition will be announced in early June, and the three prizes of €50,000 will be awarded in late October 2016.

    [​IMG]

    2016 theme: Integrated Futures
    The European Commission called for innovations in products, technologies, services and models that can support the integration of refugees and migrants. Innovations can relate to any aspect of the reception and integration process including, but not limited to, ideas around:

    • education and skills development
    • employment and entrepreneurship
    • access to appropriate housing and health services
    • safety and human rights
    • community cohesion and cultural diversity.
    Applications that are led by or have been co-created with refugees and migrants were encouraged.

    Theme background
    Europe has recently witnessed a dramatic increase in the number of refugees and migrants travelling to the continent with more than a million new arrivals.

    This unprecedented inflow of people, many of whom are vulnerable individuals seeking international protection, presents a challenge across Europe not only in terms of their immediate reception, but also with regard to their long-term integration into society.

    Throughout history, common values and the collective identity of Europe have been shaped by the help of the diversity of its people. The shift in population and migration represents not only a challenge but also an opportunity to build new inclusive communities and to grow Europe’s economy.

    Many refugees and migrants have the potential to be the next entrepreneurs and innovators, but without the right support, their skills can be wasted and they may become marginalised.

    Innovative and creative approaches are needed to realise the potential of refugees and migrants. This year’s competition is therefore entitled Integrated Futures.

    For more background on innovative and effective approaches to migrant integration, read through the series Beyond Crisis: Migrant Integration on the Social Innovation Europe platform.

    How to enter the competition
    The competition was open to individuals, groups and organisations across the European Union and in countries participating in the European Horizon 2020 programme (see list[​IMG] [​IMG]).

    It is governed by the following rules of contest, which may be specified through the FAQs. A template of the entry form is also available for information.

    The competition process
    The competition is organised in two phases:

    Phase 1: Out of the total of entries received by the deadline, 30 semi-finalists will be selected to receive mentoring support and progress their ideas. They will be invited to take part in the Social Innovation Academy, and to network with other European organisations and potential partners in their field of activity. The names of the semi-finalists will be announced in early June 2016.

    Phase 2: Out of the 30 semi-finalists, 10 finalists will be invited to the Awards Ceremony where the 3 final winners will receive a prize of €50,000 each.

    In order to select the best entries throughout the competition, the European Commission is supported by an external jury[​IMG] [​IMG] (316 KB) made up of 12 experts.

    Timeline of the competition:

    • Launch of the competition: 25 February 2016, Amsterdam
    • Deadline to submit an entry: 8 April 2016, 12:00:00 (noon, Central European Time)
    • 1st jury meeting in Brussels: 31 May 2016
    • Announcement of the 30 semi-finalists: 3 June 2016
    • Social Innovation Academy for semi-finalists: 4-5-6 July 2016, Berlin
    • Submission of detailed plan by semi-finalists: 2 September 2016 (tbc)
    • 2nd jury meeting in Brussels: 27 September 2016 (tbc)
    • Announcement of the finalists: 30 September 2016 (tbc)
    • Awards Ceremony: 27 October 2016, Brussels (tbc)
    Competition background
    The European Social Innovation Competition has been organised since 2012 in memory of Diogo Vasconcelos. Take a look at the previous competitions:

    Contact
    Follow our #diogochallenge journey on Twitter: @EUSocialInnov.

    For questions about the competition, please email: [email protected]
     
  15. Marcus Busby

    Marcus Busby Junior Member

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    European Social Innovation Competition Entry

    1. Project Name (10 words max):

    :
    A spatio-temporal framework for migration, settlement and integration planning

    2. Tweet your idea (in 140 characters):
    :
    UNITY in DIVERSITY #SDGs #greeninfrastructure #urbandesign & #complexsystems
    #innovation answer #migration #integration & #growth in #Europe

    3. Provide a summary of your idea highlighting how it aims to facilitate the reception
    and integration of refugees and/or migrants in Europe.

    :
    A spatio-temporal complex systems model. Providing a tangible framework combining
    innovative approaches to spatial design, natural capital restoration, economic development
    and integration; capable of catalysing emergent economies, knowledge, experience,
    innovation; fostering integration, skills-development, entrepreneurship, employment,
    quality education, growth, ecological restoration and climate adaptation, for long-term
    prosperity and resilience; exemplifying the Sustainable Development Goals.

    Capable of receiving large volumes of people from diverse backgrounds in short time-
    frames, applicable in any region of the planet. To provide short to long-term housing,
    water, food, energy, health and opportunity. After a comparable start-up investment period,
    it becomes economically autonomous, then an economic driver.

    bit.ly/GCoT22

    4. Explain why you believe your idea is innovative in the country or context where it
    will be implemented. Alternatively, if your idea is based on something that already
    exists, explain how your idea differs to this.

    :
    A model at the leading edge of urban design, complex systems, ecology and spatial
    complexity research in Europe, America and Asia.

    A seed for a new economic growth cycle, based upon emergent green-blue circular
    economies of proximity, combining new technologies, established design approaches and
    equal advances in ecological restoration techniques.

    The model facilitates contemporary emergent growth in the latter Kondratiev, by emulating
    macrocosmic transitional growth at microcosmic levels – for specialised and localised
    successional growth.

    A built environment tailored to emergent economies, and already adapted to contemporary
    socio-cultural-environmental challenges; new jobs, knowledge and growth are created and
    sustained.

    As a stand-alone development, surpluses supply external markets. As an urban extension,
    it is an innovation district for the evolution of skills, products and services, supporting the
    adaptation and amelioration of existing urban centres.

    A synergy of complimentary mixed-use zoning, unity in infrastructure, and diversity in
    socio-economic and cultural activities, it embodies the drivers for successful population
    centres.

    Design and implementation is participatory and collaborative through bottom-up
    development, guided by top-down planning in the form of technical support and
    administration.

    It differs from urban and refugee camp designs, using complexity as a creative starting
    point, generating a different kind of architectural avant-garde. Unity comes from top-down,
    diversity is generated bottom-up. This allows “place”, belonging, uniqueness, identity and a
    sense of community ownership and participation, whilst planning, management and
    administration is streamlined.

    A template for transit-orientated, complex, fractal, scalable and sprawl-mitigating, zero-
    carbon, climatically resilient, walkable, metabolic and ecologically functioning settlement in
    dynamic equilibrium.

    bit.ly/GCoTpics

    5. Describe clearly how your idea is expected to have an impact.
    :
    The economic impacts will be growth of emergent sectors, in technology and software,
    communications, materials science, transportation and energy. This is achieved through
    facilitating exemplars.

    Social impacts will be the existence of the first collaboratively designed settlements in the
    new age, embodying the values of the democratic process, symbolising the common
    heritage and common future. These ideals may extend beyond Europe, recognising this
    future shall be the unification of understanding, as cultures converge in realisation of
    interconnectedness as a capable global family.

    Environmental impacts will be the catalysis of transitional growth towards repair of, and
    symbiosis with, the natural capital of the planet for a return of surplus. Employing
    ecological approaches to landscape management and restoration, as creators of diversity
    and stability, harnessing natural equilibrium, sequestering carbon into the soils and
    vegetation, proven by example by World Bank restoration projects.

    This method of restoration creates collaboration, resources and revenue. It encourages
    the re-employment of expertise in respective fields. Restoration of natural equilibrium
    increases return (per calorie) of energy invested, cutting energetic deficits - responsible for
    so much global degradation. This approach fuels the necessary transition in contemporary
    culture.
    Employing this model, has positive implications for migration, integration, the economy and
    international relations. It also addresses other major peacetime concerns; urban sprawl,
    energy transition, future prosperity, resilience to climate change, human development and
    well-being.
    Creating opportunity, economic returns and growth for the host country, it also equips
    refugees with knowledge, connections and skills that will be vital on returning home.

    6. Indicate at what scale your idea will operate initially and how it could be
    implemented at a larger scale in the future, for instance in another region of your
    country or in another European country.

    :
    A prototype can be modelled before going operational and assessed by experienced
    professionals. An appropriate scale for this can be a test-bed for around 340 people. This
    can involve modelling a settlement comprised of 49 MoreThanShelters Domo shelters.
    The evolution of this camp can be modelled, including long-term effects.

    Due to the adaptability of the model it depends upon specific criteria as to how it is
    employed. The full benefits of the model may not be comparable until it supports a
    population exceeding around 2,400 persons – comparable to an established village.
    The model has initially been presented at city-scale. The concept expands to all scales,
    ranging from 7-50 residents, to city-scale, anything over 120,000 residents and beyond.
    The framework is intended for receiving high volumes of migrants, to be received and
    settled as members of a functioning community within a short time-frame.

    This approach was designed specifically for scaling – hence the spatial design is based
    upon recursion and fractal geometry - potentially infinite in nature. Modularity facilitates
    planning and expansion by allowing spatial extensions to be budgeted long-before
    implementation. The materials and quantities for implementation can be standardised;
    facilitating costs-forecasting and materials sourcing.

    bit.ly/BusbyAca

    7. Specify how your idea could be sustained over the next three years.

    :
    Interest and sustainability is achieved through maintaining a festival mentality. A mentality
    of celebration – celebrating the productive achievements of humanity in combining the arts
    and sciences.

    Planning and construction undertaken with professionalism and dedication, complimented
    by a celebratory atmosphere, maintained by entertainments, group activities and
    participatory projects; creating social life and cohesion found in successful settlements –
    restaurants, cafes, music and theatre, childrens activities and events. Many examples
    exist in places which have received refugees, often by refugees themselves.

    The build objectives, defined by participatory urban planning processes, familiarise people
    with collaborative processes and construction undertaken through a series of workshops
    and demonstrations, training people on-the-job.

    Celebration is integral to festivals and can share many properties with renewed
    approaches to integration. Feelings of displacement, loss, exhaustion, sorrow are
    somewhat maintained by emergency environments. However UNHCR Environmental
    Demonstration Projects Manuel, 2000 states:

    "Field experience demonstrates that programs, which empower refugee populations to
    develop sustainable farming, housing, and energy producing practices help avoid
    expensive environmental rehabilitation projects and can produce local employment.
    Such programs foster feelings of self-worth among traumatized exiles and transform a
    chaotic settlement into a community that possesses knowledge and skills that will benefit
    both refugees and environment."

    bit.ly/RefForum
     
  16. Marcus Busby

    Marcus Busby Junior Member

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    https://knowledgebase.permaculture.org.uk/practical-solutions/built-environment

    Built environment
    [​IMG]
    LILAC Leeds - Low Impact Living Affordable Community
    www.lilac.coop

    The built environment is a material, spatial and cultural product of human labour that combines physical elements and energy in forms for living, working and playing. It has been defined as “the human-made space in which people live, work, and recreate on a day-to-day basis” (1), (2).

    The definition of a sustainable built environment is changing rapidly. While aiming for neutral or reduced environmental impacts in terms of energy, water, carbon, and waste, it is becoming clear that the built environment must go beyond this, to have net-positive environmental benefits for the living world. (3)

    This potential implies that the built environment can be regenerative; produce more than it consumes, as well as remedy pollution and damage. It is a departure from the idea of being sustainable - that the best the built environment can be is ‘neutral’ in relation to the living world.

    A regenerative built environmentmay employ buildings, processes and systems that restore, renew or revitalise sources of energy and materials in a way that integrates the needs of society with the integrity of natural systems and nature (4).

    Green Building, Low-Impact, 'green infrastructure' and 'ecosystem services' are contemporary phrases among emergent terminology, decribing approaches being used in the design and implementation of ecological built environments that possess a low embedded energy in their realisation, at the same time as being ecologically, and/or environmentally regenerative.

    Subcategories
    [​IMG]
    Green building methods
    [​IMG]
    Retrofitting
    [​IMG]
    Water and sewage
    [​IMG]
    Natural disaster resistance
    [​IMG]
    Owner building

    Books

    Participatory Urban Planning Toolkit Based On The Kitale Experience A guide to Community-Based Action Planning for Effective Infrastructure and Services Delivery
    PARTICIPATORY URBAN PLANNING - Planning the city with and for its citizens
    Benefits of Green Infrastructure - Report by Forest Research
    JOURNAL ARTICLE : More green space is linked to less stress in deprived communities: Evidence from salivary cortisol patterns
    Final report of the Horizon 2020 expert group on 'Nature-based solutions and re-naturing cities'
    JOURNAL ARTICLE : Urban self-sufficiency through optimised ecosystem service demand. A utopian perspective from European cities
    JOURNAL ARTICLE : Ecosystem Services and Biodiversity
    Green Infrastructure - Training Manual for Trainers
    JOURNAL ARTICLE : Ecosystem services, and human health and well-being
    JOURNAL ARTICLE : Permaculture for agroecology: design, movement, practice, and worldview. A review
    Green Infrastructure: Smart Conservation for the 21st Century
    Permaculture: A Designers' Manual
     
  17. Marcus Busby

    Marcus Busby Junior Member

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    https://knowledgebase.permaculture.org.uk/practical-solutions/green-building-methods

    Green building methods


    Green building methods describe a series of processes that minimize the environmental impact that a building has throughout its life, from initial design through to eventual dereliction or demolition.

    Key focuses of green building methods are the use of natural, recycled and sustainable building materials, the efficient design and use of water and power systems, reduction in pollution and waste, and minimizing damage to the local ecosystem, during and after construction. This subject area focuses on construction and design techniques; energy technologies, water and sewage, and natural disaster resistance. Self-build and tools are dealt with in other sections of the Knowledge Base.

    [​IMG]

    Books

    Regrarians Handbook
    Shelter
    Homework: Handbuilt Shelter
    Building Green: A Complete How-To Guide to Alternative Building Methods
    Handbook of Sustainable Building: An Environmental Preference Method for Selection of Materials for Use in Construction and Refurbishment

    Organisations

    Centre For Alternative Technology (CAT)
    Auroville Earth Institute, Research Centre India
    Abbotts Living Wood Centre
    CAT Centre For Alternative Technology
    Brighton Permaculture Trust
    Low Impact Living Initiative (LILI)
    Low Impact Living Initiative (LILI)

    UK Green Building Council

    Videos

    [​IMG]
    Living With The Land | Part 2 | Natural Building
    Kevin McCloud, a Channel 4 presenter well known for the TV series Grand Designs, introduces part 2 of Living with the Land - 'Natural Building'.

    Websites

    ARTICLE : How to get planning permission for an off-grid, self-build home - lowimpact.org
    Pratical Action Construction Technical Information Service Knowledgebase Page
    Greencore Construction : exemplary low carbon buildings using natural materials (predominantly hemp, lime and timber).
    LILAC - Low Impact Living Affordable Community
    ARTICLE : Vauban: the World's Most Successful Model for Sustainable Urban Development? by David Thorpe
    Centre for Alternative Technology (CAT) Information Service
    UK Green Building Council

    Subcategories

    [​IMG]
    Straw bale building

    [​IMG]
    Timber framed

    [​IMG]
    Walter Segal

    [​IMG]
    Adobe

    [​IMG]
    Passive solar construction

    [​IMG]
    Pattern language

    [​IMG]
    Earthship

    [​IMG]
    Earth sheltered construction

    [​IMG]
    Lime plaster

    [​IMG]
    Using stone

    [​IMG]
    Passive house (Passivhaus)

    [​IMG]
    Energy Efficiency
     
    Last edited: Apr 8, 2016
  18. Marcus Busby

    Marcus Busby Junior Member

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  19. Marcus Busby

    Marcus Busby Junior Member

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    Rhamis Kent 9/15
    Strategies for Reviving the Earth - Reviving the Earth - Ep9
    [​IMG]



    Problems associated with agriculture and the solutions for these problems. The episode also discusses strategies and models for bringing back dead lands to life.
     
  20. Marcus Busby

    Marcus Busby Junior Member

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    https://www.researchgate.net/public...on_in_the_international_permaculture_movement

    Copyright © 2015 by the author(s). Published here under license by the Resilience Alliance.
    Ferguson, R. S., and S. T. Lovell. 2015. Grassroots engagement with transition to sustainability: diversity and modes of participation
    in the international permaculture movement. Ecology and Society 20(4):39. http://dx.doi.org/10.5751/ES-08048-200439

    Grassroots engagement with transition to sustainability: diversity and modes
    of participation in the international permaculture movement

    Rafter Sass Ferguson 1 and Sarah T. Lovell2

    ABSTRACT. Grassroots networks and social movements are increasingly regarded as agents of change that can help respond to
    environmental degradation both by generating novel solutions to existing problems and influencing institutions toward more substantive
    responses. We examine permaculture, an international movement that, despite its broad international distribution and relatively high
    public profile, has received little systematic scrutiny in the scientific literature. We attempt to remedy that gap by conducting a broad
    international (though English-only) survey of 731 permaculture participants, and assessing the socio-demographic characteristics of
    the movement. The survey examined self-identified roles of permaculture participants and explored the relationships between those
    roles and socio-demographic factors race, gender, and socioeconomic status. The influence of structural factors on participant roles
    was examined by including multidimensional national indices development, inequality, and ecosystem vitality, for the 45 countries in
    the sample. Results showed the participation of women at or above parity (53%), while participation by race showed a white supermajority
    (96%). Multivariate regression demonstrated that race, gender, and socioeconomic status are shaping participation in distinct ways and
    that each interact with structural factors. The effects of gender on social roles varied with ecosystem vitality, with women scoring higher
    than men in countries with high levels of ecosystem vitality, and the reverse where ecosystem vitality was low. The observed effect of
    race on practice varied with national inequality, such that the scores of respondents of color were equivalent to white respondents in
    countries with the least inequality, but descended as inequality increased, while whites were unaffected. Different indicators of
    socioeconomic status depressed and amplified different dimensions of participation. Results point toward a theoretical framework that
    identifies multiple levels and sites through which socio-demographic factors shape participation in grassroots environmental action,
    and the outlines of such a framework are discussed.

    Key Words:
    diversity; environmental movements; grassroots networks; permaculture
     

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