Pinto peanuts - taking over everything!

Discussion in 'Planting, growing, nurturing Plants' started by PeterW, Mar 25, 2012.

  1. PeterW

    PeterW Junior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2011
    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Pinto peanuts were recommended as great nitrogen fixers in my permaculture training, but nobody told me how invasive they are. They have taken over three whole raised beds in our vege garden. About a year ago I spent a couple of days eliminating them (I thought) from two beds - digging down to get them out the hard way. Now they are back in those beds stronger than ever, and the task of digging them out again seems futile. They have also carpeted other areas of our garden, and are advancing strongly through the citrus grove. This year's incredible rainfall is boosting them out of all sight.

    (I'm in Nimbin, very wet subtropical climate)

    Does anyone have any experience of successfully getting rid of them?

    Any comments appreciated,
    Peter
     
  2. sweetpea

    sweetpea Junior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2005
    Messages:
    1,442
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Thanks for warning us. Sorry it's turned out to be so troublesome. I live in a very rural place where I guess you could say the weeds are invasive, it's not possible to get rid of them, but I can keep them at bay by blocking out the light with something heavy, like boards, or very thick black plastic with chunks of broken cement over the top or at minimum of a shovel's depth of dense, wet straw with boards and blocks.

    I mow the weeds first, as close to the ground as I can get, then block the light, but the heavy part is what speeds it up. In just a few days they will get all pale and smashed. It would take weeks to knock them back somewhat. If the greens can't get light they will eventually slow down and hopefully die back. If they were weighted all winter it would be more effective.

    But I was just thinking, I have this great little clover ground cover that I encourage because of its ability to fix nitrogen, and it has great little flowers that the insects love, and I leave it, but dig out a small place to put transplants in, and leave the rest in place.

    Do you think your vegetables could grow surrounded by the peanuts? Maybe they will be compatible. keep the greens pulled so the peanuts do not shade everything else, but dig out the planting area, don't just pull the greens. Then very densely mulch with straw or hay on top of the peanuts, blocking out the light, but not over your vegetables, just around them.

    The peanuts are fixing nitrogen, which is good, they are a good crop? You didn't say whether you liked the peanuts? Is your soil nicer with them there? Are there more worms?
     
    Ian likes this.
  3. PeterW

    PeterW Junior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2011
    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Thanks for the suggestions. I'll try mowing (actually brushcutting) two beds and covering them with black plastic. I'll leave one covered for 2 months and the other for 4 months, then see how they look.

    The idea of running them around the veges is problematic: they grow much faster than just about any veges, and their roots go quite deep, say at least 45 cm / 1.5 feet, which is also deeper than most of the veges. I think that without DAILY cutting back and fussing around every vege plant, the veges would lose the battle, and that's without considering the pinto peanuts' habit of spreading UNDERground - i.e. invisibly. I tell you they're a nightmare!
     
  4. ppp

    ppp Junior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2007
    Messages:
    550
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Sounds like they are doing their job nicely
     
    Ian likes this.
  5. PeterW

    PeterW Junior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2011
    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    0
    If their job is to colonise the world with pinto peanuts, I'd agree with you. I'm hoping to recruit the right plants for my job of growing veges for our table.
     
    Ian and chamni like this.
  6. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2009
    Messages:
    5,925
    Likes Received:
    7
    Trophy Points:
    0
    You must have the ideal climate for them. At my place I put in runners almost 2 years ago and they are still only about 1m2 around the original planting. Think of it as a mulch / compost resource that you don't have to buy rather than as a weed. It helps keep your blood pressure down!
     
  7. mluthi69

    mluthi69 Junior Member

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2012
    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Oh... if I had property I'd love to buy some. I paid $200 for about 200 cuttings. Talking about a resource - pot and sell the damn things
     
  8. Grasshopper

    Grasshopper Senior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2010
    Messages:
    1,016
    Likes Received:
    9
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Exactly you have a gold mine not a weed.
     
  9. S.O.P

    S.O.P Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2011
    Messages:
    1,456
    Likes Received:
    5
    Trophy Points:
    38
    So, what you can suggest is, only plant them under trees as a groundcover?

    I bought two packs of Pinto Peanut from Green Harvest, had 5 germinate and they are growing quite slow in my shaded 'forest' area. So much so, I'm thinking of getting cuttings to speed it up.

    Does anyone think, with the Pinto Peanut inoculate that was surrounding the seed, would the bacteria still be alive in the soil and inoculate cuttings planted nearby?
     
  10. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2009
    Messages:
    5,925
    Likes Received:
    7
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I got runners from Permasculptor and they have root nodules even though I never used an inoculant.
     
  11. S.O.P

    S.O.P Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2011
    Messages:
    1,456
    Likes Received:
    5
    Trophy Points:
    38
    I did a half-day of internet sleuthing for rhizobia-symbiosis in exotic nitrogen-fixers and from that I ascertained that exotics will bond with rhizobia but won't fix the maximum amount of nitrogen.

    Here are two quotes that may be interesting to some:

    - Source

    Rhizobium Research Laboratory FAQ - further reading.
     
  12. lantanaland

    lantanaland New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2012
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Not sure how to eradicate but i'd take as many cuttings as possible!
     
  13. crazyideas

    crazyideas Junior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2013
    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Hi Peter

    I live at the gold coast and i am desperate to get some pinto peanut. Could i possibly come for a drive down and dig some runners?

    Scott
     
  14. Sandman

    Sandman Junior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2013
    Messages:
    42
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I hope my perennial peanuts grow that well in our food forest. Eventually, our trees and shrubs should be large enough that the shade will thin it out, but I still hope it will be there poised and ready to occupy any spots that are sunny enough for it. I think what you have is great for a perennial polyculture, maybe not so great for annuals.
     
  15. barefoot farmer

    barefoot farmer New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2013
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I grew hundreds of plugs and planted them into my food forest interrows. They are a brilliant ground cover. Like grass but doesn't need mowing. Also, they don't nodulate with the rhizobium. They fix nitrogen with no visible signs if they are innoculated.
     
  16. Jjef

    Jjef Junior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2010
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    1
    I'm having trouble sourcing a large amount of cuttings of pinto to establish a ground cover. Can anybody help?
     
  17. chamni

    chamni Member

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2017
    Messages:
    59
    Likes Received:
    19
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Gender:
    Male
    Climate:
    tropical rainforest
    Aeschynomene americana L.
    วงศ์ : LEGUMINOSAE-PAPILIOIDEAE
    I use this plant bec. it has small leaf that can provide sunlight troughly and my another reason is I can grow my bolete mushroomThaeogyroporus porentosus (berk. ET. Broome)
     

    Attached Files:

  18. Grasshopper

    Grasshopper Senior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2010
    Messages:
    1,016
    Likes Received:
    9
    Trophy Points:
    38
    The neighbours block is covered in them .
    It took years ,it must have been introduced on lawn mowers.
    Im still waiting for it to come my way its started in places,the ones I planted from seed didn't do much.
    It doesnt seem to be a problem next door and it survives even without months of rain.
    I wouldnt mind some around my vineyard and stabilising my cliff.
    I just need to be patient
     
    chamni likes this.
  19. Christine Lockton

    Christine Lockton New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2017
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Gender:
    Female
    Climate:
    Sub tropical
    Hi Peter,

    Would like to buy some of your Pinto Peanuts, I don't mind them being invasive as they have chickens to contend with. Please let me know if you can help. THanks
     
  20. chamni

    chamni Member

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2017
    Messages:
    59
    Likes Received:
    19
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Gender:
    Male
    Climate:
    tropical rainforest

    Attached Files:

Share This Page