Hello All from a Western Australian

Discussion in 'Introduce Yourself Here' started by Yued, Apr 22, 2019.

  1. Yued

    Yued New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2019
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Climate:
    Mediterranean
    I'm located about an hour north of Perth a few miles inland from the coast. Its 5 acres of local natives with some weeds of course. Natives are mature Banksia and Blackbutt (aka Prickle Bark or Todtiana), with a variety of tough scrubby bushes eg Prickly Moses (ouch!). I'd like to keep as much natural bush as possible, and follow permaculture principles to develop small food production etc. Not keen to do anything without a decent plan, so hoping to learn plenty.

    It gets pretty hot and dry in summer, 6 months of drought, and the soil is sandy and porous, so water is my first priority. I don't know if swales work on sandy soil when the water just disappears into the ground. Is there a way? Or are there alternatives to keep water in the soil?

    Anyway I look forward to learning and sharing info with you all.
    Yued is the screen name (after Yued Country in respect to the local Noongar tribe), Gary is also fine... :)
     
    songbird likes this.
  2. Jason_H

    Jason_H Member

    Joined:
    May 24, 2017
    Messages:
    34
    Likes Received:
    8
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Bridgetown
    Climate:
    Cool Mediterranean climate
    Hi Gary,
    Welcome aboard. I'm a bit further south than you (250 km south of Perth) but we have similar rainfall patterns with six months of drought or near enough. I'm actually planting banksia and prickly my for bee food, among other species. We also have sandy soil on our property but have not tried swales or keyline or anything yet.

    If you haven't come across them yet, look up drylands permaculture farm, they're choos to you

    Best of luck
     
    songbird and Yued like this.
  3. Yued

    Yued New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2019
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Climate:
    Mediterranean
    Thanks Jason.

    I saw a video by Geoff Lawton who warned against our tendency to want to act just to feel useful. Often doing nothing is more productive - ie work out the design before anything else. Start small (zone 1), grow incrementally and let the system design evolve. And I would add don't mimic the neighbours ;)
     
    songbird likes this.
  4. Guy Sullivan

    Guy Sullivan New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2019
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Gender:
    Male
    Climate:
    Drylands/Mediterranean
    Hi yued
    We're in Geraldton...
    We've only been here three years..
    Totally agree that just observing for a long while is best way not to be re-doing/un-doing things..

    Drylands is just out of town here...
    If you're ever up this way definitely make the effort to visit!!
     
    songbird likes this.
  5. Rachel B Well

    Rachel B Well New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2019
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Gender:
    Female
    Climate:
    Mediterranean/Arid
    Western Australia

    Hi Gary, I also live in the Perth hills with rocky, sandy soil. I have found that open swales are not so effective, but filling the swales with organic material (mulch is great) really helps. Carbon is a sponge and will retain moisture and build your soil profile.
    Whenever i plant a tree now I did the hole as big as I can and put sticks and mulch in the bottom to act like the sponge, holding the water and releasing it when the plant needs it. Cover the mulch with a layer of soil so the roots are not directly touching it then plant the tree. Try not to use really sandy soil for this layer because it will preserve the mulch instead of letting it break down into soil.

    We have sloping land so I also dig a mini swale on the bottom side and fill that with organic matter to stop runoff and collect water which is stored in the carbon
    The roots will eventually tap into this source of moisture and nutrients.
    Same with veggie gardens, mini swales filled with organic matter to catch water and create soil. Most veggies have fairly shallow roots so if you can hold the water in the top 12 inches they will be happy :)
    And keep mulching and building

    I just did my PDC and I'm keen to make connections with other permies in West Australian, particularly around Perth.
    Hope you stay in touch and share your permaculture adventures
    Rachel
     
    songbird likes this.
  6. Amouri

    Amouri New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2019
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Gender:
    Male
    Climate:
    Dry no rain 6 months of the year
    Hi All,
    I'm on the journey of permaculture and I'm trying to learn as much as I can. I'm also on the lookout for a block of land in the South West of Western Australia (as I currently live in Geraldton). I'm a High School teacher and would like to ultimately teach Permaculture and spread the word. Early days
     
    songbird likes this.
  7. songbird

    songbird Senior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2013
    Messages:
    1,809
    Likes Received:
    145
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Occupation:
    gardening, reading, etc
    Location:
    near St. Charles, MI, USoA
    Home Page:
    Climate:
    -15C-35C, 10cm rain/mo, clay, full sun, K-G Dfa=x=Dfb
    if you can look at your land and see surface erosion of any kind then yes this is a place that will be helped from some kind of swales or similar water catchement design features and/or perhaps windbreaks if the erosion is wind driven instead of water. i do agree with you that to start just observing for a while and learning about your native plants and what you might want to do.

    welcome to the forums. :)
     

Share This Page

-->