Can I use ni-mh batteries in my garden solar lights?

Discussion in 'Environmental and Health Professionals Interested' started by jingwei3344, Aug 12, 2015.

  1. jingwei3344

    jingwei3344 New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2015
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    The solar light batteries in my garden are dead. Upon replacing them, I realized they were the old Ni-Cd rechargeable batteries.
    I have heard that these batteries are not so good for the environment because they contain toxic chemicals (see Wikipedia). I would like to use Ni-MH batteries instead.
    Would this be recommended or will slowly charging these batteries using solar panels shorten its life span?
     
  2. Bryant RedHawk

    Bryant RedHawk Junior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2014
    Messages:
    576
    Likes Received:
    69
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Arkansas Senior Appraiser
    Location:
    Vilonia, Arkansas, deep in the woods
    Climate:
    USDA zone 7b,8a.
    First off, ni-mh batteries also contain toxic chemicals, just not quite as nasty as ni-cd in some ways, other ways they are just as nasty. Sadly there is no great alternative available at this time for batteries. All batteries should be turned in to a recycling center for safe disposal. This means that no matter which type of battery you choose, it is a danger to the environment to just throw them in the trash for the land fill or, as some negligent folk do, burn them.

    Most batteries of the enhanced type have disposal directions on the packaging, just follow those and all will be safe. As far as the recharging issue, most need a special charger, it would be best to contact the mfg. to find out what they recommend for their products.
     
  3. ISPhysics

    ISPhysics New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2014
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    All toxic chemicals have come either straight from earth or are composed/decomposed from earth matters. The difference with many metals are that they come from deep inside of earth where they have negligible effect on the organic surface. Even radioactive metals/isotopes when they are deep inside the earth they are fine. They have been there for cazillion years while earth was clean and (natural).

    Mining is one of the most dangerous human activities to human lives and the ecosystem. Especially those open pit mines that rinse off mud from deep inside and bring this toxic slosh in the surface. All the ni-cd batteries in the world dumped into your backyard may not be as toxic as the stream down a copper or gold mine.

    So the question is not what humans do as individuals but what human industry does.
     

Share This Page