12.5 SETTLEMENT AND HOUSE DESIGN (humid cool to cold)

Discussion in 'Designing, building, making and powering your life' started by Rhino, Nov 27, 2018.

  1. Rhino

    Rhino New Member

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    Temperate, 35º latitude
    Could anyone refer me to temperate climate (35.3º, -81.7) passive solar building plans that are low tech' and affordable?
    I am considering scrapping the earth tube, SIP panel, & garage (see attached plans) and incorporating 15mm of sheeps wool in walls and ceiling, & insulating earth a meter below the structure (as the designers manual suggests.)
    In this PDC Bill says to insulate 18" (of 2" foam) below the foundation & inside the footings. I gathered that the original 1 meter was thought to be overkill?
    Is reverse brick veneer considered best practice for the walls? Are there plans for rammed earth that could be approved by my local government in NC, USA?
     

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  2. 9anda1f

    9anda1f Administrator Staff Member

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    "Low tech and affordable" ...
    hmmmmm. Earthships?
    WRT your existing plan, are you eliminating the garage and SIP construction to reduce costs? (an admirable goal)
    15mm of wool seems quite thin, is there a local insulation code you're required to meet?

    I think that the depth of "curtain" insulation is directly related to your frost depth. I would insulated to the local frost depth plus at least one foot.
    Reverse brick veneer (installing brick veneer on the inside of the house's insulated envelop) is an excellent way to add thermal mass. One of my neighbors has a 2600 gallon water tank within his insulated space as you can investigate here: http://owlcroft.com/owlcroft/flrplan.html
    Rammed earth local to you: https://www.apartmenttherapy.com/green-tour-green-with-an-abund-57539

    How much work are you prepared to do yourself? Or will you contract most of the construction?
    For current bang-for-the-buck construction (that' not diy) I would begin by considering an insulated slab-on-grade foundation topped with a modular home (not a manufactured home/mobile home), with an attached greenhouse/sunspace on the south side. This can easily obtain a mortgage and building permits, is a quality construction meeting all the building codes required for "stick" construction, are well insulated, and readily resell-able if the need should arise. The more esoteric your plans, the more difficult to obtain any financing needed, building permits, and even insurance.

    Thoughts?
     

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