Category: Water Harvesting

Convergence of Issues Leads to Southern California Permaculture Convergence, August 29-31, 2008

Cooling off after the first day of the Southern California Permaculture Convergence, hosted by the Quail Springs Learning Oasis and Permaculture Farm Yesterday the Southern California Permaculture Convergence got underway. The word ‘convergence’ is the operative word here, and, ironically, to me at least, has a double meaning. Over the last couple of weeks, being here at Quail Springs just reminds me of the convergence of issues we face as […]

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New Permaculturists in Kamiah, Idaho

While on a consultancy at the future site of the Kamiah Permaculture Institute at Kim and Julie Pagliaro’s FNA Ranch, Geoff and Nadia visit the neighbor’s (Carol and David Johnson) permaculture garden in Kamiah, ID. Just a little exposure to permaculture by their neighbour’s students set them off on the high road to sustainability. You know how the advert goes – you tell two people, they tell two people, and […]

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Dams and swales in Minnesota

Hi folks! — we have been busy digging up Minnesota with dams and swales. This is just the beginning of the “Permaculture Research Institute for Cold Climates”. We’re now on route to California, hopefully to do some more serious digging. :) Here’s how we started: Click thru for the entire photo series!

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Use of permaculture under salinity and drought conditions

Jordan is an arid country with limited water resources. The available renewable fresh water resources dropped drastically to an annual per capita share of 155 m3 in recent years compared to 3400 m3/cap/year in 1946. It is considered also as one of the 10 poorest countries worldwide in water resources (Countries with less than 500 m3/capita/year are regarded as having “absolute scarcity”). In 2004, the total water use in Jordan […]

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Water in the Mexican landscape

Water gives life and can also destroy life. When we allow rain water to flow gently over the landscape taking the most time making the most contact with earth water is most fertile. But, when running uncontrolled it can cause erosion and death. No food can grow on land which is eroded and farming can only flourish on fertile soil. But only eco-systemic farming systems can create soil. At ITT […]

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