Category: Storm Water

Ponds can absorb more carbon than woodland – here’s how they can fight climate change in your garden

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article. Mike Jeffries  Associate Professor, Ecology, Northumbria University, Newcastle.   Ponds are taken for granted. Perhaps it’s because most of us have seen them – and on occasion, fallen into them – and think they’re only good for goldfish. Ponds may be the number one habitat for children’s “minibeast” hunts, but we are supposed to grow […]

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Constructed Wetland

In May 2018 I was invited to work in Western Australia, which was quite the milestone for me, as it was the last state in Australia for me to say I’ve worked nation wide in permaculture design and installation. It was meant to be a short trip, only 5 days, to repair a leaky dam, which seemed a bit odd for me to fly from the east coast to the […]

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Dryland Harvesting Home Hacks Sun, Rain, Food & Surroundings

When Brad Lancaster and his brother bought their home in downtown Tucson, the streetscape was a dusty place, devoid of trees or any vegetation. In 1996 Lancaster and his neighbors started an annual tree planting project, which up till now has resulted in over 1,400 native food-bearing trees being planted (usually with water-harvesting earthworks) in the neighborhood. In 2004, Lancaster augmented the street tree planting by using a 14-inch, gas […]

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California Drought Update. A Way Forward

California’s drought woes are well known. One Central Valley farmer thinks he might have at least a partial solution: flooding. While most farmers would steer clear of what seems like a counterintuitive plan, Cameron thinks the ambitious scheme could help put “millions of acre feet” of water back into the valley’s underground aquifer. Doing so in the winter, when El Nino runoff is in great supply, can help replenish the […]

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Swales in North Texas Take on 2.5 inches of Rain and Perform Perfectly

In this video, Jack Spirko, shows just how effective good Permaculture Earthworks are in capturing 26,000 Gallons of water from a “barn burner of a storm”. This morning we got 3 hours of pouring rain. Then this afternoon we got hit with close to an inch in less than 30 minutes, and it totally filled the swales and overflowed them all. To drive home how passive this water system is, […]

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Water Management in Urban Areas

Water management in rural areas has always been an issue of great interest. On the one hand, water for human, stock and crop use is critical to living and producing. It is also a major factor in the very visible degradation of streams, the creation of gullies and changes to the natural flora and fauna associated with streams. The common farm-scale actions of clearing, road construction, ploughing, (over) grazing and […]

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Drought-Proofing California…not in the news

Digging our well-surveyed swales. I woke up this morning, put on my gum-boots and went out for a walk around our family farm in the rain. This in itself might not seem to be anything special to many folks, yet this was a 2”/5cm rainfall after several intense years of drought here in Southern California. I cannot express how exciting this morning has been for me as I was thinking […]

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Hey! It’s High Cold Dry and Windy and Doing just Great!

Every now and then you come across climate that is not so user-friendly. It’s in the High, Dry and Cold and Windy desert environment of Nevada’s high country near Reno. A place with many challenges. Sagebrush and horse trails dot the landscape. It is cowboy country. So what on earth is a Permaculture teacher doing in such a windswept environment? Neil Bertrando lives here and in three years has used […]

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Experimenting with Overflowing Circles and Slow-Flow Swales (Panama)

The jungle garden I am not Bill Mollison or Geoff Lawton, they will both happily report; rather, I am but a humble novice when it comes to permaculture, experimenting my way through ideas, mimicking when I can, improvising when research falls short. And, it was somewhere in between mimicry and improvisation that I came up with what I’m calling overflowing circles and slow-flow swales. I wanted to catch water, of […]

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Fernglade Farm – Water Storage Systems (Victoria, Australia)

by Chris McLeod Spring has arrived early this year. As I write this article, I’m sitting out in the food forest writing on a warm, late winter’s evening, supervising the chickens and pondering the future summer season. You see, water is a critical system at the farm here, so it is often on my mind.

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