Category: Food Plants – Perennial

A Forest Garden With 500 Edible Plants Could Lead to a Sustainable Future

A Forest Garden With 500 Edible Plants Could Lead to a Sustainable Future

National Geographic in this short film shows us an example of forest gardening of food forests from the UK. Martin Crawford’s forest garden is 25 years old, first established on a flat field in 1994, now it’s a forest full of fruit and nut trees, shrubs, herbs, vines, and perennial vegetables mimicking a natural ecosystems and natures patterns. The land serves and as an education demonstration site showing what might […]

Read More >
4 Comments

Ramps: Saving Our Wild Edibles

Since moving to North Carolina a couple of years ago—my, how time flies—Emma and I have developed a minor obsession with foraging. We’ve learned to confidently identify over a dozen types of edible wild mushrooms here, dining on choice varieties as chanterelles, maitake, chicken of the woods, and comb tooth (Hericium coralloides), a relative of the highly medicinal lion’s mane. We’ve also frequently enjoyed wild plants such as chickweed, dandelions, trout […]

Read More >
0 Comment

Still Greening the Desert

To learn more about Geoff Lawton and the Permaculture Masterclass series visit:  https://www.discoverpermaculture.com/a/12454/bzgDtpeF I’ve been working in Jordan since 1999, and it is one of the most water-scarce countries on earth. The Dead Sea Valley, at 400 meters below sea level, is also the lowest place on earth, so the climate has Mediterranean weather with subtropical heat. The soil and water are the saltiest I’ve ever worked with. In the […]

Read More >
1 Comment

Vanilla Cultivation: A Practical Guide for the Tropical Homestead

The vanilla orchid (Vanilla planifolia) is one of the world’s most interesting plants. Of the nearly 35,000 species of orchid, the second largest botanical family of plants, vanilla is the only species that produces an edible fruit. True vanilla is a sought after product, usually the second most expensive spice in the world, yet we associate the word vanilla with plain, boring, and commonplace. Native to Mexico and Central America, […]

Read More >
2 Comments

The Herbs of Zaytuna Farm – Rosemary

Welcome to Zaytuna Farm. To get here you turned off the highway and drove through rolling hills, covered with macadamia plantations, dairy and beef herds, essential oil plantations of native trees and shrubs, and vegetable farms. You turn into the driveway, and follow the dirt road down the hill until you see the wooden sign for parking. You pull into the shade of some giant bamboo and park your car. […]

Read More >
1 Comment

How to Design and Build A Forest Garden – Part 1. Surveying

Last Autumn we tried out a new course format, the “Design ‘n Build”, an intensive practical course where we go through the whole design process and complete the build of a project within 3 days. We had an amazing group join us for our first course and managed to complete the design and build of a 100 m2 forest garden consisting of around 120 plants representing 22 species (not including […]

Read More >
3 Comments

Soil Testing, Discovering Local Plants and Woodland Coppice

Robinia Coppice We have a small woodland plot where we have been experimenting with coppicing. The dominant tree species in the woods are Robinia pseudoacacia – Black Locust  a North American native that naturalized in the area after being introduced here many years ago. Last spring we felled some of the trees in order to start the coppice. The aim is to grow the support stakes for our market garden from the coppice. […]

Read More >
0 Comment

The Polyculture Market Garden Study – Results from Year 4 – 2018

Here are the results from the fourth year of our Market Garden Polyculture Study. This study looks at the differences between growing annual vegetables and herbs in polycultures vs growing them in  traditional blocks. In this post you will find an overview of the trial garden and the polycultures we are growing, a description of what we record and the 4th year results from the trial. You can find results […]

Read More >
0 Comment

Fastest Growing Trees in the Temperate Zone, Seed Harvesting and a Green Toad Gathering – The Polyculture Project

If you follow our project you will probably know that I like to name our gardens after concepts and terminology from the classical period of Ancient Greece or at least you may have noticed that the gardens have weird names . Ezekiel who joined us last week asked why the market garden did not have a such a name which prompted me to fix that, so from now on the […]

Read More >
2 Comments

How to make your garden have less weeds?

How to make your garden have less weeds?

In crop gardens, we sometimes get into a spatial race with weeds, and the solution is to replace the weeds with “designed weeds” to take up the space. This can be done with green manure mulches to fertilize the gardens and supply quality mulch. This is an example of how understanding the inner workings of weeds allows us to harmonize with natural systems to both repair the earth and create […]

Read More >
0 Comment

THE END OF THE POLYCULTURE STUDY 2018, AQUATIC PLANT PROPAGATION AND NUT HARVEST.

The Polyculture Study 2018 has now officially come to a close for the year, and we will be publishing the annual report and results by December.  Once again we have been supported by a truly amazing team of people, without whom, the study would simply not be possible. This year we have been able to work on two trials across two gardens, as well as developing a plan for a […]

Read More >
1 Comment

7 Ways to Use the Humble Choko Vine

Its spring time in Australia, and our area in Far North Queensland has gratefully received a decent fall of rain. I’m gleefully anticipating the springing to life of our un-irrigated areas that had gone dull and dormant during the dry weather. Among other things, I’m looking forward again to abundant chokos. I used to think of choko as a bland, boring vegetable. I didn’t like skinning it, and I didn’t […]

Read More >
6 Comments