Category: General

INHABIT – a Permaculture Perspective

Yekra Player Please click above to watch the Trailer INHABIT – A Permaculture Perspective Humanity is more than ever threatened by its own actions; we hear a lot about the need to minimize footprints and to reduce our impact. But what if our footprints were beneficial? What if we could meet human needs while increasing the health and well-being of our planet? This is the premise behind permaculture: a design […]

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Part Two – Nottinghill Forest Garden – 2011: Project Commencement

This is Part two of a series of Articles, that critically discuss’s the Nottinghill Forest Garden Project from Analysis – to Implementation – to Future Idea’s. Part one can be found here Site Preparation Discussion “Mainframe Design” Although observation and basic design began in 2010, we did not commence the garden in earnest until January of 2011. After analyzing our site’s conditions and forming a basic long-term vision for the […]

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PDC Resource Set

2014 was a busy year at Sugarloaf Permaculture. Half way through we started teaching our first PDC that was held at the local community gardens over 14 Sundays. After finishing at the end of November, I was relieved as my evenings were less pressured without the constant preparation and some Sundays were ours again. After some days, while out in the garden, I reflected on the huge number of hours […]

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Valuing the Marginal and Developing Diversity:

Introduction: Resilience through Diversity Nature is most abundant on the edge. The interface between two or more ecosystems, organisms, or cultures is often where the most valuable, diverse and productive elements of a system emerge. Like the diversity of a healthy ecosystem, diverse educational communities are more resilient, socially efficient, and sustainable. In the face of global environmental and economic challenges, English as Second Language (ESL) and Multicultural educators have […]

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Growing Bush Tucker!

Take eating local one step further and grow your own native edibles. It’s not only delicious, attracts native wildlife but often requires less work on your behalf because Australian plants are generally hardy just like the environments they usually grow in. I’ve listed a few to get you started.

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Two Hands Are Better Than One (and Other Reasons to Buy Secondhand) and Why It All Pertains to Permaculture

Shopping secondhand starts off for most as an act of frugality. We notice that buying a car, a computer, a TV, furniture, guitar, sweater … anything! … is so much cheaper if it’s been used for a year or two prior, maybe even shows a bit of wear, that unsightly scar on the paint job or the stain from an errant cup of coffee. We take joy in finding stuff […]

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“Poo to Peaches” – a Composting Toilet Kickstarter

To learn more about the Poo to Peaches project and become a backer, visit the Kickstarter page Every day, the average person flushes 10 gallons of clean drinking water down the toilet. This constitutes a waste of two precious resources: scarce water supplies and human manure, which could instead be composted to form a fertile soil amendment. While composting toilets (CTs) of various styles are commercially available and legal for […]

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Creating a Forest Floor through Chop and Drop

Tom Kendall from the Permaculture Research Institute Sunshine Coast Tom Kendall from the Permaculture Research Institute Sunshine Coast talks about his plans for the swimming pond which was dug 2 years ago. Support species are establishing growth, but after a big rain it is time to do some chopping and dropping and encouraging the growth of other species by creating a forest floor.

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The Paradox of Oil: The Cheaper it is, The More it Costs

There will be oil, but at what price? – Chris Nelder and Gregor Macdonald     Samuel Alexander – is a lecturer with the Office for Environmental Programs and research fellow at the Melbourne Sustainable Society Institute (MSSI), University of Melbourne. He also co-directs the Simplicity Institute. The author would like to thank MSSI for supporting the writing of this article, and Josh Floyd, Matt Mushalik, and Jonathan Rutherford for […]

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The Chicken “Run” on Steroids!

A tractor trailer dropped off a pallet of organic feed onto my tiny dock. This cost me $800 and would only last 3 months. I had organized a feed co-op to save a $2 a Bag. That brought my 50 pound bag of organic feed to $34. That was the fall of 2013 and it ended up being the last time I ever bought commercial feed for my flock. I’ll […]

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Tracing a Devastating Path: A Toy’s Story.

By Cheri-Lynn McCabe and Sandra Bartram The extreme air pollution in Beijing, China was among the leading environmental news stories for the week of January 20, 2015. The smog-causing small particulate matter, PM2.5, reached twenty times the allowable World Health Organization limit as reported in the online edition of the Guardian. Although the Chinese government had committed to reducing PM2.5 by 2015, the current data suggests that efforts to date […]

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Left All Alone: A Tale of Permaculture’s Prowess

This became a favorite spot for our daily hike, after a morning’s work, lunch settling in our bellies as we scuttled across the rocks of the Rio Chico under the afternoon sun. I’ve always liked the idea that, once a permaculture system is in place, the largely perennial garden will not merely survive but actually thrive without you. My wife and I have started this year volunteering on farms in […]

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