Category: Earthworks & Earth Resources

Bulldozer Digging Swales

Bulldozer Digging Swales from Midwest Permaculture. The Design We had been invited by a family in Southern Missouri to assist with the design of a 320-acre farm. They want to transition the land into a Permaculture landscape capable of producing a wide range of perennial foods (nuts, vegetables, herbs, fruit, etc.) as well as livestock (beef and goats). Over generations, rain has slowly degraded this sloping landscape with a loss […]

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Swales (Continuous Contour Trenches) Bring Water and Life Back to Maharashtra, India

This (unfortunately low-res) video shares the clear, practical benefits of bringing sensible low-tech Permaculture water harvesting techniques such as swales to our landscapes. In Maharashtra, India, swales are restoring the hydrological cycle, bringing dried up wells and springs back to life, and stopping erosion of the precious soils that subsistence farmers depend on.

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Experimenting with Overflowing Circles and Slow-Flow Swales (Panama)

The jungle garden I am not Bill Mollison or Geoff Lawton, they will both happily report; rather, I am but a humble novice when it comes to permaculture, experimenting my way through ideas, mimicking when I can, improvising when research falls short. And, it was somewhere in between mimicry and improvisation that I came up with what I’m calling overflowing circles and slow-flow swales. I wanted to catch water, of […]

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Broadacre Farm Design – Regenerative Agriculture at Work (Australia)

Over the past year Yandoit Farm has been going through a few changes. Located in Victoria, Australia, north of Hepburn Springs, the farm has had an interesting past, at times being heavily mined for gold, with the miners living on the property, and more recently used to run cattle. Working with an array of permaculture and regenerative agriculture designers the stewards of Yandoit Farm, Lisa and Michael, worked on designing […]

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More Thinking Out Loud About Earth Repair Tools: The Agricultural Specification Unimog

Continuing with the theme of my last piece, another ideal potential equipment platform is the agricultural spec’d Unimog, manufactured by Mercedes-Benz. These are highly versatile and very reliable vehicles equipped with capabilities typically associated with tractors — namely 3-point linkages, PTOs (Power Take Offs), and hydraulics. Just as with the tractor, a broad array of implements may be used for the purpose of repairing degraded landscapes.

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Earthworks Course Introduction with Geoff Lawton (video)

If you’re considering doing Geoff Lawton’s Permaculture Design Certificate Course later this month and want to know more, check out the Bonus $1200 Earthworks course we are including for free. It’s a mixture of classroom and field lectures that will bring you up to speed and teach you how to build dams, ponds, swales, water features, spillways and house sites using excavators.

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Swale Pathways (Tasmania, Australia)

by Good Life Permaculture Diagram of a traditional swale system Hobart is Australia’s second driest capital city (Adelaide’s first) so catching and storing water is often on my mind. Annually we get approximately 615mm, most of which arrives in the cooler months in and around Winter. During Summer our soils will dry out so ferociously that some soil types (including ours) will form cracks big enough to stick your hand […]

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Swales Filled by Melting Ice and Snow (Texas, USA)

We just harvested over 20,000 gallons of ice and snow melt into our swales. Last week we had about 4 inches of snow and ice — mostly ice. It totally coated the roads and shut down the city for about four days. Yesterday (7 days into it) we finally got a really warm day and major melt. This is the result — 20,000 plus gallons of water gently soaked into […]

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Keyline Design as an Organizing Pattern for Permaculture Design, Part 2 (Sweden)

This is part 2 of a series of 5 articles looking at design considerations for our Cold Climate Permaculture site using the Keyline Scale of Permanence as a organizing framework, as well as an informative read for anyone interested. The aesthetic curves of the Keyline layout at ridgedale PERMACULTURE The previous article introduced some basic Keyline concepts and looked at the Site Specifics and how the Landform will influence the […]

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Desert Food Forest and Organic Commercial Production in Three Years – Update on Wadi Rum Consultancy (Jordan)

Outside the fence On August 6, 2010 Craig Mackintosh posted on my initial consultancy for the site I’m reporting on today. Three years and three months later, I can give an update on what has transpired since.

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