Sean Dixon-Sullivan

Cooking the Three Sisters: Maize, Beans and Squash

Maize, beans and squash form the famous polyculture known as the Three Sisters. Grown from Mexico to Chile, from ancient Incans to modern natural farmers, the trio cooperates symbiotically in the field. It also does so in the kitchen: three simple yet delicious dishes combine as a wholesome meal. Taught by Juan, a natural farmer in the mountains above Cali, Colombia, who learned it from an old campesino, who said […]

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Permaculture Practices of the Incas

In the quest for El Dorado the Conquerors may have overlooked the truly valuable resource forged by the Incan Empire: soil fertility. According to a half-Incan chronicler of the period: In the time of the Incas that cultivated the area was a garden of gold and silver, as existed in the royal houses of Kings, where there were many herbs and flowers of diverse types, lesser plants, large trees, animals […]

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Some New Angles on Grazing Cells

The Big Scrub is gone; destroyed by loggers and cattle farmers a century ago. What was once Australia’s largest subtropical rainforest—900km2 of biodiversity—is now largely home to cows and grass. Even between these two components many landowners still struggle to enforce balance. Thistle-covered paddies, eroded hillsides, compacted soils with sparse vegetation—scars from this struggle cover the region’s rolling lowlands..

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