Samuel Alexander

Imagining A Better World: The Art Of Degrowth

We are living in an age of gross ecological overshoot – our demands on the planet far exceed what is sustainable. Wealth is extremely concentrated while billions go hungry. And with the world’s population heading toward 11 billion by the end of the century, something has to give. One response to these overlapping crises is degrowth. This movement argues that the developed regions of the world, including Australia, will need […]

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Art Against Empire: Toward an Aesthetics of Degrowth

Last friday, I launched my new book called Art Against Empire: Toward an Aesthetics of Degrowth. This book is the outcome of a year-long collaboration with culture jamming artists around the world who produced over 170 images that make up the substance of the book. You can see some of the images here and the book is available for purchase here. What role might art need to play in the […]

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Culture Jamming Art: Book Launch Invite

This is one final reminder for those in Melbourne who might be interested in attending my book launch this Friday, 20 October, at 5.30pm, at Melbourne University. More details and RSVPs at this link, please share with others who may be interested. There will be live music from the amazing Matt Wicking and free beer and cider from the Good Brew Company. There will also been an exhibition of some […]

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Words for Awakening: Voices of Inspired Revolt

Over the last few months I have been working with my co-director of the Simplicity Institute, Simon Ussher, collecting together provocative and inspiring quotes and excerpts from our favourite thinkers and writers, related to the themes of simple living, frugal abundance, money and wealth, crisis, mindfulness, nature mysticism and sacred activism. In our new book, Words for Awakening: Voices of Inspired Revolt, each of these quotes have been placed over […]

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Introduction to ‘Entropia’ by Samuel Alexander

In 2013 I published my first book of fiction, Entropia: Life Beyond Industrial Civilisation. This book has just been published in French, with a foreword by Serge Latouche, so to mark this occasion I’m publishing the introduction to Entropia below (in English). If you know any French speakers, please share this link with them. To purchase your ebook copy of ‘Entropia: Life Beyond Industrial Civilisation” click here. The story I am to tell […]

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Residencies available at the Wurruk’an Ecovillage and Permaculture Farm (Victoria)

Wurruk’an is a small and emerging ecovillage in Gippsland, Victoria. We’re located just outside of Moe, about 2 hours east from Melbourne on the train line towards Traralgon. The 20 acre property is an inclusive gathering space for people seeking to explore meaningful alternatives to consumer capitalism and demonstrate simpler ways of living. There are currently four of us living at Wurruk’an. We like to think of ourselves as friendly, […]

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The Dark Cellars Project: An Aesthetics of Revolt

A couple of months ago I made a call out for artists and graphic designers to be in touch if they wanted to explore ways to use art and image to unsettle the normality of consumer capitalism and provoke thought about alternative ways to live and be. I was overwhelmed by the response, with over 50 artists writing back expressing their interest in a culture jamming project. In recent weeks […]

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The Moral and Ethical Weight of Voluntary Simplicity: A Philosophical Review

A vast and growing body of scientific literature is impressing upon us that human economic activity is degrading planetary ecosystems in ways that are unsustainable. Taken as a whole, we are overconsuming Earth’s resources, destabilising the climate, and decimating biodiversity (Steffan et al, 2015; IPCC, 2013; WWF, 2016).

At the same time, we also know that there are billions of people around the world who are, by any humane standard, under-consuming. Alleviating global poverty is likely to place even more pressure on an already over-burdened planet.

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Live Without Dead Thyme: Photo Tour of Garden

I spent Saturday night under a 100 year old pear tree with David Holmgren, Su Dennett, and a spirited gathering of Victorian permaculturalists, for their annual summer solstice party. Fun and uplifting times. David and Su’s property Melliodora is a genuine permaculture paradise – and an inspiring example of what can be done. My household’s urban homestead doesn’t compare, but over the years we have been making efforts to practise […]

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Any Graphic Designers Out There? A Call Out for Collaborators

The Simplicity Institute is mobilising for a new ‘culture jamming’ project next year and we’ve started gathering a team of skilled graphic designers (and potentially visual artists more generally) to collaborate. If this sounds like you and you are keen to volunteer some of your time (a few hours or many hours) to creating striking images that challenge consumerism and the growth economy, and advance the visions of voluntary simplicity, […]

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Deface the Currency: The Lost Dialogues of Diogenes

I’m happy to announce the publication of my new book – or, rather, my new ‘philosophical play’ in six acts – called Deface the Currency: The Lost Dialogues of Diogenes. Here is the advance praise the book received from Dr William Desmond, author of The Greek Praise of Poverty. “This is a creative re-enactment of the life, death and ideas of the most influential Cynic of antiquity, Diogenes of Sinope. […]

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Wild Democracy: A Biodiversity of Resistance and Renewal

1. Introduction With characteristic insight, the great American philosopher, John Dewey, once wrote: ‘Every generation has to accomplish democracy over again for itself.’[1] His point was that, at each moment in history, citizens and nations inevitably face unique challenges and problems, so we should not assume the democratic institutions and practices inherited from the past will be adequate for the conditions of today. Our ongoing political challenge, therefore, is to […]

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