Zone Four Chop and Drop

Even though its getting to the end of the wet season and is possibly a bit late I have started the chop and drop process on the zone four swale. It has been planted out to timber trees and support species and of course quite a lot of natures additions have germinated as well. I have plenty of other things that I could be doing however I think that the timing of addressing the plants that I don’t want is perfect. Most of them I can pull out roots and all by hand so it is a reasonably simple task. If I leave it any longer then evaporation will be higher than rainfall, the ground will be harder, the roots will be deeper and so it will all become harder and the result will be less satisfactory. This is a classic example of timing and management, the two important factors which need to be considered with “Using Biological Resources”.

Feature Image Above – Before the shot.

The end result after “chop and drop” on the zone 4 swale.
The end result after “chop and drop” on the zone 4 swale.

While I was working today I noticed something from last years chop and drop in this area, and this was where on the steeper upper slope I had laid on contour the branches. This was an attempt to increase the chance of debris catching and being held to enable organic matter to build up and then seeds can germinate and start to stabilize the steep slope.

The chopped branches laid on contour to capture debris.
The chopped branches laid on contour to capture debris.

I think it worked well. When ever I am leaving material behind I always lay it on contour to take advantage of this natural action. “Working with Nature” The only way to go!!

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