Posted by & filed under Courses/Workshops.

Do you want to learn about Permaculture earthworks and water harvesting?

Tiger Hill Permaculture is offering two free placements for individuals in the local Tasmanian community for the upcoming Introduction to Earthworks course facilitated by David Spicer and held at Tiger Hill Farm in Tasmania on the 20th and 21st of February 2015. (You will arrive on the evening of 19th for course start the next day.)

Read more »

Posted by & filed under General.

From Prairie to Monoculture’ is a three minute video tour of the industrial food industry. Let your friends know that monoculture is not farming. It is a plant factory on the ground where there is no life.

Posted by & filed under Aid Projects, Commercial Farm Projects, Community Projects, Demonstration Sites, Education Centres, General, Urban Projects.


An abundance of jackfruit at Project Bonafide in Nicaragua

Five years ago I had the opportunity to join a land-based project (Rancho Mastatal Sustainable Education Center in Costa Rica) already eight years into operation. At my arrival I found a site that had focused on infrastructure and program building over its initial life span. This was an important leverage point in building a financial base as an education center, but it meant that some aspects of the campus were still in their infancy, such as the agricultural and food preservation systems. I arrived during a shift in focus to the latter systems, which enabled me to participate simultaneously in different phases of site establishment.

Read more »

Posted by & filed under GMOs, Health & Disease, News.

The full scheduled voting on a state-wide ballot for Measure 92 in Oregon to label GMO foods won’t come in until November 4th, but voting has begun, and we’re winning!

The measure would ensure that the labeling of genetically modified foods was mandatory, and that Big Food corporations along with Big Chemical like Monsanto and Dow wouldn’t be able to label foods ‘if they felt like it’ as the Grocery Manufacturer’s Association has suggested we consumers allow.

Read more »

Posted by & filed under Biodiversity.

A landmark study by an international group of scientists has concluded that planet Earth is on the brink of a mass extinction event comparable in scale to the one that wiped out the dinosaurs 65 million years ago. The researchers found that extinction rates are currently 1000 times higher than normal due to deforestation, global climate change, and the depletion of ocean fisheries.

Read more »

Posted by & filed under Aid Projects, Community Projects, Society, Urban Projects.

Rebuilding the commons in an economically-divided, violence-scarred neighborhood

by Orion Kriegman

Egleston Square is a rapidly gentrifying neighborhood, straddling the borders of Roxbury and Jamaica Plain (JP) in the city of Boston. High condo prices and even higher rents are pushing long-term residents, to move elsewhere. This churning of the real estate market, to be expected in a profit-maximizing system, dissolves community and acerbates race and class divides. It is now common to hear of talk of “Two JPs”-– one prosperous, highly educated, professional and largely White, and another struggling, working class, mainly immigrant and Hispanic. The story of the Egleston Community Orchard is a story of these two realities coming together.

Read more »

Posted by & filed under Consumerism, Economics, Society.

When unemployment figures start to decrease in many countries, economists and governments congratulate themselves on their ability to ‘stimulate’ demand.

This week, one London-based school that is devoted to teaching emotional intelligence responded by releasing a video that explores the distinction between good and bad demand, and ‘employment and misemployment’.

They have uploaded the full script of the video on their website. I found this passage particularly inspiring.

Read more »

Posted by & filed under Aid Projects, Animal Forage, Breeds, Community Projects, Demonstration Sites, Education Centres, Livestock, Urban Projects, Village Development, Waste Systems & Recycling, Water Conservation, Water Harvesting.


Awassi sheep ready to go to market (and random standards inspector)

I’ve been to the Greening the Desert “Sequel” site three times now. Once was in 2011 when we were at the IPC in Jordan. Once was in 2012 when I went there to take an internship with Geoff and Nadia. This year I was able to go back there to teach a PDC myself. So I’ve seen some of the development of the site over the past three years as the trees have grown up, formed a canopy and started to alter the microclimate of the site quite appreciably. And it’s been a huge success. Most of us who came across Permaculture in the last ten years will remember the first time they saw Geoff’s original Greening the Desert video. The “Wow! That’s really possible?!” feeling it gave was an inspiration for a lot of us to get into Permaculture in the first place. For me at least, with the site also being so close to Palestine, and the Middle East conflict in full swing, the idea that we could enact some form of practical non-violent action to improve the lives of the local population by facilitating new approaches to management of resources through less input-intensive techniques than the typical western models was truly mind blowing.

Read more »

Posted by & filed under Commercial Farm Projects, Dams, Land.

Over the past year Yandoit Farm has been going through a few changes. Located in Victoria, Australia, north of Hepburn Springs, the farm has had an interesting past, at times being heavily mined for gold, with the miners living on the property, and more recently used to run cattle.

Working with an array of permaculture and regenerative agriculture designers the stewards of Yandoit Farm, Lisa and Michael, worked on designing and implementing a whole farm design to regenerate the land.

Read more »