Water Harvesting

Water Harvesting Feat

Precious water is here today and gone tomorrow. As a homesteader I see a fault in my homestead. I need a large source of dependable water for a backup. I have my deep well that can go dry or will start pumping up clay after 300-400 gallons of water in one use. That is fine for daily use, but I don’t feel secure with it. We don’t use our well […]

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Maximizing Yield with Vertical Spaces

Organic hydroponic vegetables Vertical garden

According to the United Nations, the amount of arable land per person has decreased from about one acre per person in 1970 to approximately half an acre in 2000; that number is expected to be roughly one-third an acre by 2050. The U.N. also estimates that the world’s population will reach 9.7 billion by 2050. Given that, we need to explore our options with regards to food production, especially in […]

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The Low-Down on Double-Dig Gardens

The Low-Down on Double-Dig Gardens

I hear and read many people who are completely against double-digging, and to state this upfront, for those most part, I’m in complete agreement with their assessment. I am a believer in no-dig gardens. Even more so, I think being patient with our soil situations—planting what will grow and piling organic matter atop the soil to replenish the nutrient cycle—works. I’ve seen it work in dry situations, in clay situations, […]

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Hugel Swales May be a Bad Idea

Hugel Swales May be a Bad Idea feat

Ok, so this conversation has been addressed in the correct way and was explained by Jack Spirko at http://permaculturenews.org/2015/11/06/dont-try-building-hugel-swales-this-is-a-very-and-i-mean-very-bad-idea/. This very bad idea, Hugel-swales on contour, should not be done!!!!! We can however accomplish the morph on small scale as explained by Jack Spirko, but not in the true “this is how to build a swale” and “this is how to build a Hugel.” Again, do not do what I […]

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Roselle

Hibiscus sabdariffa or roselle fruits

Striking, unusual, edible, and useful.  Those four words do well to describe Hibiscus sabdariffa – L., aka Roselle.  That small bit of information should be enough for anyone to consider planting this beauty in their garden, but to learn more, read on!   Roselle, can also go by the names hibiscus, Florida cranberry, flor de Jamaica, Jamaica sorrel, sour-sour, Queensland jelly plant, jelly okra, and many more.  Roselle is a […]

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Permaculture Kitchen Garden

Herb garten

Who doesn’t love cooking with fresh herbs? I love cooking with fresh ingredients. Using fresh cut culinary herbs and edible flowers is a really special thing. All growers know that from the time the plant is harvested you start losing flavor and nutrients. It’s important to get fresh-cut herbs if you want the most amazing flavor for you and your family. Permaculture is such a heartwarming way to grow. You […]

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Virtual Reality to Help Us Make Mistakes: Smart Failure and How it Relates to Permaculture

Virtual Reality to Help Us Make Mistakes feat

Many people have spoken or written about the importance of thinking that reflects the changing world around us; “Everything you’ve learned in school as “obvious” becomes less and less obvious as you begin to study the universe,” (1) as R. Buckminster Fuller put it. The universe is constantly changing, so it doesn’t make sense for us to learn “obvious” answers because every situation we find is uniquely different. Permaculture as […]

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How Traffic and Soil Compaction Affects Growth and Yields

How Traffic and Soil Compaction Affects Growth and Yields feat

As any farmer will tell you, the health of the soil is directly responsible for the health of a crop. More than just the essential nutrients and water, the roots of plants need air pockets and microorganisms in the soil as well. This allows the plants to be able to properly intake nutrients like nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K) available in the soil to grow large and strong. […]

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Learn About Permaculture From Award-Winning Engineer & Ecologist, Rob Avis.

2011.06-Nelson-PDC-435 - feat

WORKSHOPS OFFERED ACROSS SOUTHERN ONTARIO IN FEBRUARY 2017. ABOUT THIS ONE-DAY WORKSHOP: Maybe you’re looking to cut your energy use and invest in solar or wind power. Maybe you’re imagining what it would be like to keep backyard chickens, start composting your kitchen scraps or grow healthy food on your front lawn (or a year-round garden in your passive solar greenhouse). Maybe you’ve even got ambitions of reducing water consumption, […]

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Okra:

Oklahoma Okra Garden

Lady’s fingers, ochro, kopi arab, bhindi, okro, and gumbo; all pseudonyms for that quirky edible seedpod, officially known as Abelmoschus esculentus, that many of us simply call okra. Okra is nestled comfortably in the Malvaceae (mallow) family of plants, which also houses hollyhock, cotton, and hibiscus. While there is some question if okra is a fruit or vegetable, it does contain seeds all wrapped up in a nice little package […]

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Berry Island

berry fruit

My property has a right-of-way cutting off a small section of my land for my dear neighbor so she can get to her property. I see this section of land as a small island and found a great opportunity to do something a little different with it. This will be my second year working on ‘Berry Island’. It’s really cold right now about 20 degrees Fahrenheit, so I obviously won’t […]

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Giving Classes on the Homestead

Homesteading Classes feat

Hosting classes on the homestead can make extra income while helping people that are interested in what you have to teach them. I really enjoy talking with people about all the things I do and the things I would like to experiment with. I also love networking and sharing information. Having classes on my homestead gives me a chance to make these connections. It’s also difficult to find homesteading type […]

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