Small Scale Nursery Applications: Reflections from Loping Coyote Farms Nursery (NV, USA)

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by Neil Bertrando , Eric Toensmeier Plant materials are a critical component of any homestead or agroecology site, and by using the permaculture design concept, we can figure out many yields to pattern into our management activities. I want to explore some opportunities presented by integrating a small scale nursery into the process of site development, based on my experiences in a high desert climate context on sites of <2 […]

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Workshop: Food Forests for Dry, High-Altitude, Cold Climates with Eric Toensmeier and Neil Bertrando (October 2013, Reno, NV, USA)

Yellowhorn (Xanthoceras sorbifolia) is a nut crop for cold, arid climates. To register visit Urban Roots. Day One: Home Scale Saturday, October 5, 2013 9am -5pm Edible Forest Gardens Edible forest gardens are edible ecosystems that mimic the structure and function of natural forests, while producing food and other useful products. Trees, shrubs, vines, perennials and fungi work together in polycultures to create low-maintenance gardens or larger productive landscapes. Includes […]

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For More Wonder, Rewild the World (TED video)

Wolves were once native to the US’ Yellowstone National Park — until hunting wiped them out. But when, in 1995, the wolves began to come back (thanks to an aggressive management program), something interesting happened: the rest of the park began to find a new, more healthful balance. In a bold thought experiment, George Monbiot imagines a wilder world in which humans work to restore the complex, lost natural food […]

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U.S. Nuclear Power in Decline

by J. Matthew Roney, Earth Policy Institute Nuclear power generation in the United States is falling. After increasing rapidly since the 1970s, electricity generation at U.S. nuclear plants began to grow more slowly in the early 2000s. It then plateaued between 2007 and 2010 — before falling more than 4 percent over the last two years. Projections for 2013 show a further 1 percent drop. With reactors retiring early and […]

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Purple Root Water Hyacinth – A Natural Remedy for Pollution

A weed that has spread from South America to many tropical and semi-tropical countries now developed by Chinese scientists into a variety that is far less invasive and very effective at cleaning heavily polluted lakes and rivers. by Prof Peter Saunders A fully referenced and illustrated version of this article is posted on ISIS members website and is otherwise available for download here. Pollution in Dianchi Kunming, the capital of […]

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Peak Oil Is Alive and Well, and Costing the Earth

by Dr Samuel Alexander, co-director of the Simplicity Institute and a lecturer with the Office for Environmental Programs, University of Melbourne. Originally published on theconversation.com. There’s plenty of oil, but at what price? (Source: arbyreed/Flickr) You might have heard that peak oil — the theory that one day crude oil production will stop increasing, even as demand grows — is dead. Shale oil production is surging in the US. The […]

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Obama’s Rogue State

The US calls on other nations to abide by the treaties it violates. by George Monbiot You could almost pity these people. For 67 years successive US governments have resisted calls to reform the UN Security Council. They’ve defended a system which grants five nations a veto over world affairs, reducing all others to impotent spectators. They have abused the powers and trust with which they have been vested. They […]

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Wildlife Friendly Gardening Begins Beneath Us

Why dig? Why turn over tonnes of topsoil year after year. We know permanent soil has properties that annual crops need and which sustains bio diversity. Why disturb and destroy the goodness that nature provides? Salad, herbs, onions, garlic, brassica, peas, beans, and ornamentals are examples of plants that can be cultivated without digging. One simple method to achieve surface drainage and root development with minimal soil disturbance is to […]

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It’s Not All About The Honey

Internships at Zaytuna Farm under the the direction of Geoff Lawton are an excellent way to build up your knowledge of permaculture in practice. The internship is a 10-week program and included in that ten weeks are advanced permaculture skills classes such as Earthworks, How To Teach a PDC, Permaculture Aid, Urban Permaculture and the Soils course. These scheduled classes make up for half of the internship. What you may […]

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How Cuba Leads the World in Permaculture (Podcasts – Parts I & II)

Part I: Cuban Food Crisis after the Soviet Union Collapsed Roberto Perez, speaking at IPC10 in Jordan Photo © Craig Mackintosh Roberto Perez is a pioneer of the permaculture movement in Cuba where a food production revolution occurred starting in 1993, four years after the 1989 collapse of the USSR and the socialist block. In the interview, Perez describes the hunger crisis that followed the loss of Cuba’s main trading […]

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Making Mushroom Growing Sustainable – Part 1, the Set-up

Oyster mushrooms Gourmet mushrooms are an excellent addition to a Permaculture farm. They are nutritious and delicious and they really stand out on your market stall table. Many farmers around the world grow them to add diversity to their produce range and to make use of the shadier areas where most plants won’t thrive. But mushrooms are funny little creatures and like most other living things they won’t flourish unless […]

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