Permaculture for Resiliency in International Development through USAID

Initial earthworks for an orphanage in Kenya with poor soils in an arid climate. By Warren Brush of Quail Springs Permaculture and Casitas Valley Farm and Creamery With rapidly changing climactic and social conditions, we are witnessing instability in many human support systems around the world. Systems that are heavily dependent on centralized infrastructure and globalization for their basic needs of shelter, water, energy and food are the most susceptible […]

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Finding Ways to Prevent Water Waste and Save on Rising Produce Costs During California’s Historic Drought

THE CURRENT STATE OF CALIFORNIA’S UNPRECEDENTED DROUGHT Startling Statistics California is currently in its fourth year of a severe drought. The United States Drought Monitor estimates that over 90 percent of California is currently experiencing “severe” to “exceptional” drought conditions. For farmers, the increasing scarcity of water has been devastating. According to the American Farmland Trust, California is home to 27 million acres of cropland. Nine million of those acres […]

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The Magic and Mystery of Constructing a Herb Spiral and Why Every Suburban Lawn Should Have One

Herb Spiral (Panama) One of the first permaculture projects I did was building an herb spiral, and to be honest, the design has never ceased to delight me. Undoubtedly, that one and the few spirals that followed are amongst the most beautiful garden beds I’ve made. More importantly, they are also amazingly productive and a great way of getting into the mindset choosing the right spot to plant stuff, both […]

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Arcah’s Therapeutic Permacultural Yard (Part 2)

Edited by James Turner ARCAH is an NGO that helps homeless people in the form of social farm programs like Therapeutic Communities (CT). In 2014, ARCAH formed a partnership with CT, together offering even more opportunities. These included a permaculture design of the farm, it’s first year application, and weekly permaculture lectures.

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We have an Opportunity to Step up and meet Global Challenges Together

There are so many fantastic, inspiring permaculture projects around the world. Over the last four weeks we have been sharing the stories of some of the 60+ applicants to an IPCUK scholarship fund. It would make such a difference to support as many of them as we can. The IPCUK scholarships crowdfunding project ends this Friday at 3pm. We have reached 90% of the target and have less than £1500 […]

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BioDigester Wrap Up and Making Thatch

Tom Kendall from the Permaculture Research Institute Sunshine Coast shows the end result of the Bio Digester setup: the gas. He also talks about and shows making thatch for a roof from vetiver grass.

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PDC in the Sacred Valley of the Incas, Peru

Come join us June 14-27 2015 for our Permaculture Design Course. Adam Woodman author of Gabions for Gully Erosion Peru and Contour Beds Peru is co-teaching in the Sacred Valley of the Incas, a place that is rich with history and where you will see the native cultures (Quechua speaking) working the land as they have for centuries This Bi-lingual (English and Spanish) Two-Week Intensive Permaculture Design Course (PDC) is […]

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Gabions for Gully Erosion Peru

Working on a project in the Sacred Valley Peru, I came across an opportunity to install Gabions to reduce soil erosion on a steep slope. A Gabion is a porous dam wall made from rock and small stones free standing or packed into a wire basket. They combat soil erosion by slowing the flow of water and dropping sediment and organic material behind the rock wall as water slowly leaks […]

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10th Day at the 2015 PDC Course in Altamura and Some Good Idea’s for the Future

The Permaculture Research Insitutute’s Rhamis Kent and former WWoofer Ignazio Schettini, on day ten of a PDC they are teaching in Altamura, have a brief to camera candid discussion about the PDC and their thoughts for the future. One interesting thought point is, “How do people in different countries, with the same climatic zone, solve the same problem?”.

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Recent Legislation Transforms Cities, One Roof at a Time

In March of 2015, France passed a bill supporting green energy which affects the commercial building industry. The bill requires all new buildings in commercial zones to have their roofs partially covered with either solar panels or plants. Although construction companies and builders may see this as an additional upfront cost, the long term benefits will outweigh the initial funding necessary. Environmental activists initially pushed the French government for all […]

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Rehydrating the Earth: A New Paradigm For Water Management

This article was first published in the Holistic Science Journal Vol 2 Issue 4. To view the journal click here www.holisticsciencejournal.co.uk. The wars of the 21st century will be wars fought over water – these are the now famous words of former UN Secretary General Boutros Boutros-Ghali, words that a growing number of authors are repeating today. But what if, instead of providing the catalyst for war, water could instead […]

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Are you Environmentally Organic?

Today the organic food movement is no longer considered to be a luxurious fad, enjoyed exclusively by those with the financial resources to care. Indeed, our common high street supermarkets have been cashing in on our desire to live a greener, more sustainable life and the organic market is thought to be worth in excess of $14 billion in the USA. But looking beyond the feel-good marketing, there are an […]

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