Biochar: Helps Increase Crop Yields and Mitigates Climate Change

Biochar-Helps-Increase-Crop-Yields-and-Mitigates-Climate-Change-feat

Whenever we hear the word biochar, most of us are thinking that this is not a climate-friendly method since it undergoes combustion process and can aggravate greenhouse effect. Though this is a thousand years old industrial technology technique for soil enhancer, some are still confused if it’s the real deal. Is it, in fact, a too good to be true method for agriculture? What is Biochar? Biochar is a soil […]

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Vermicomposting: How Worms Can Reduce Our Waste

Vermicomposting: How Worms Can Reduce Our Waste

Nearly one third of our food ends up in the trash can. There is hope, however, in the form of worms, which naturally convert organic waste into fertilizer. In this very well illustrated video, Matthew Ross details the steps we can all take to vermicompost at home — and why it makes good business sense to do so. Video Courtesy of Ted Ed For a great article about setting up […]

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Guilds for the Small Scale Home Garden

A Mixed Bunch

Building guilds is a clever way to put gardens together. Instead of toiling over providing this or that nutrient for plants or battling with pests or relying on the success of just one crop to provide the food, a massive mixture of productive growth is but a few preparation steps away. We often talk about guilds as a grand scheme, part of growing a food forest, starting with something huge […]

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Fomes Fomentarius in the French Alps and Paul Stamets

Fomes Fomentarius in the French Alps and Paul Stamets

Mushrooms and other fungi types already share a long history with us humans. For example, Hippocrates said sometime around 450 BCE that the amadou mushroom (Fomes fomentarius) was used for cauterizing wounds. The present day: Ongoing fungi studies Fast forward to the present day, the amadou mushroom and other fungi species are attracting more attention. That’s because they find many applications in agriculture, pest control, environmental sustainability, and even in […]

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Another Way of Learning

Opened hardback book diary, fanned pages on blurred nature lands

After thirty years of engagement with Permaculture, it never ceases to amaze me how the Permaculture Design Course (PDC) changes peoples’ lives. This brilliant understanding of how to meet peoples’ needs, without working so hard, and at the same time learning to minimise waste was crafted by Bill Mollison and David Holmgren before I came along to connect with it. I’m also hugely aware that it has always been a […]

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Small Scale Farming

James Moriarty 01

Incremental change is hard to see. Almost 2 years in and we are just starting to see the vision take shape of what we want to accomplish. There is still a ways to go, but to see how far we’ve come gives us the motivation to keep going. What is nice about small scale farming is the equal part vision and equal part execution (since it is small scale there […]

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Urban Permaculture Transformation in Michigan

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by Rachelle Yeaman and Michael Hoag. Despite being the creators and beneficiaries of the Lillie House urban permaculture site, Mike Hoag and Kim Willis are still a little amazed by all the yields they’re reaping from their property. In four years of striving to harness the power of natural systems, they’ve gone from a scraggly, compacted lawn that took thankless hours to maintain, to a low-maintenance, edible paradise. Lillie House […]

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Then and Now: A Baby Boomer Growing Up

Then and Now: A Baby Boomer Growing Up

World War II caused three major economic disruptions in Europe. The military commandeered a large part of the active workforce, governments redirected social spend to the war effort, and aerial bombing devastated many urban areas. The surviving soldiers returned to a society they hardly knew. The situation was different for military returning to the U.S. where the war economy had blossomed. Two hundred billion in war bonds matured, financing the […]

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A Sustainable Life

A Sustainable Life feat 690

When 19-year-old film student, Dan Hodgson, took an interest in what we’re doing and chose to make a film about it we were super happy to oblige.

He delved right in to explore some of the deeper issues about why environmentally-positive, highly nutritious, diverse, climate-adapted local food is so important.

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Capitalism

Capitalism

It’s been bothering me. Having spent forty years beavering away in the green movement I still get upset when people say they are anti-capitalism. So I’m trying to work out why this is. I think I’ve got it at last. When people say they are anti-capitalism they are talking about their fear that mega-corporations control the planet purely for profit. Their marketing plans are designed to shred our bank accounts […]

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Motivation For Our Work

Motivation For Our Work

Yesterday I was invited to send in a short video in which I could explain my deepest motivation for our work here. I had to think about that for a minute. We have a lot of different motives for our work, so what is the core of what we think and try to achieve? To properly figure that out I decided to start writing down some thoughts.

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What Is A Rain Gauge: Uses, Benefits, and How It Works

What Is A Rain Gauge: Uses, Benefits, and How It Works

Last night you heard the weather reporter say “Rainfall measurements of 100 mm/ 3 inches were recorded in [your area] between 6am to 8pm.” Then you’re telling yourself that can’t be true. Yesterday it didn’t rain at all. You’re sure because you were waiting for the rain all day long. What is the truth then? The local weather service uses sophisticated tools and a team of professionals monitoring the rainfall […]

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