Regaining Sustainable Agriculture Practices in the Amazon (Peru)

by William Park, Acaté Amazon Conservation View of fish pond on Matsés land with small farm on hillside The Matsés indigenous people are master farmers, and it seems strange to even suggest farming ideas to people who live almost entirely off the land. The problem is that their traditional small-scale swidden (slash-and-burn) approaches to farming, once superbly adapted for a semi-nomadic lifestyle, do not translate to newer, larger fixed settlements. […]

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Scientific American Disinformation on GMOs

America’s most trusted science magazine is spreading disinformation on behalf of a failing and desperate industry, in utter disregard of scientific integrity and the overwhelming evidence of hazards to health and the environment. by Dr Mae Wan Ho, Dr Eva Sirinathsinghji and Prof Peter Saunders. Deceptively authoritative pronouncements not backed up by evidence, scientific or otherwise A recent editorial in Scientific American entitled “Labels for GMO Foods are a Bad […]

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Ducks in Backyard Permaculture (Alaska)

Here in the northernmost tip of North America’s temperate rainforest, Alaska’s infamous cold meets some of the wettest weather in the world. Our hometown of Cordova, Alaska, receives an average of 160 inches of precipitation per year — more than 13 feet of water. In addition to the intense rainfall, we also see some very cool summer temperatures, with an average high of 55 degrees Fahrenheit (13°C). As you might […]

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PRI Zaytuna Farm Internship Project – Slope Stabilisation

My chosen internship project at PRI Zaytuna Farm was to stabilize and prevent erosion on a steep slope from an excavation back cut. I also wanted to build topsoil and increase fertility as most of the slope is subsoil clay. This is a picture of the slope before doing anything to it I decided to try the Net and Pan method described in the Permaculture Designers’ Manual by Bill Mollison. […]

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U.S. Carbon Dioxide Emissions Down 11 Percent Since 2007

by Emily E. Adams, Earth Policy Institute The U.S. Annual Carbon Footprint (Chandler 2008) Carbon dioxide emissions from burning fossil fuels in the United States peaked at more than 1.6 billion tons of carbon in 2007. Since then they have fallen 11 percent, dropping to over 1.4 billion tons in 2013, according to estimates from the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Emissions shrank rapidly during the recession, then bounced back slightly […]

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Free Online 3-Day GMO Summit (October 25-27, 2013): Register Today!

The scary truth about Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs) is being deliberately kept from you…. Fact: Your food has been unnaturally changed. These changes have very serious consequences. Your family’s health is at risk and you deserve the truth…. We’re going to share with you the true effects of genetically engineered food on human health and the environment. You’re invited to join our panel of experts, researchers and activists in an […]

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World Food Day? How about World Food Life?

Next Wednesday, October 16, sees the marking of a rather bizarrely-named festival, the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) organised ‘World Food Day’. The event is an annual one, which seems to highlight the rather curious focus of this festival: for if we are only celebrating food for one day of the year, what happens on the other 364? The aim of the event is to highlight food security […]

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What’s Holding Our Local Farmers Back?

As much as I love fresh local food, why isn’t there more of it? Why aren’t there more small farmers selling their amazing produce to their own communities? What’s stopping them? For sure, the local food movement is growing, but why is it still at the fringe of society? Or am I just being impatient? In my last post, I looked at excuses consumers make to justify their supermarket addiction. […]

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Climate Breakdown

How governments bemoan the problem but keep stoking the fires. by George Monbiot Already, a thousand blogs and columns insist that the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s new report is a rabid concoction of scare stories whose purpose is to destroy the global economy. But it is, in reality, highly conservative. Reaching agreement among hundreds of authors and reviewers ensures that only the statements which are hardest to dispute are […]

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Medicinal Plants

Medicinal plants are more than simply objects with useful chemical and symbolic aspects. They are living organisms that are functionally embedded in the cultural fabric of social groups and institutions. They play an integral role in ideas of balance and cosmological order that often reflect sophisticated medical theories of the human body, the symptoms it experiences and their underlying causes. Many different elements are involved in the complex of ideas […]

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Building an Insect Hotel

by Bor Borren For the internship at PRI Zaytuna Farm, Australia (Winter 2013) each student has the mandate to carry out an independent project. I chose to make an ‘Insect Hotel’ or a ‘Bee Hotel’. This has been given a place on the border between the kitchen garden and the adjacent food forest. On the farm there is a lot of material like bamboo, wood and recycled materials with which […]

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How Old Are We?

I am sixty years old. When confronting my age I realize that the older I get the more vulnerable I am to sickness and injury. I know that as we age we slowly lose physical strength and ability. It is hard not to get depressed about this. The prospect of eventually losing control over more areas of our lives and becoming increasingly dependent on others is not a happy one. […]

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