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  • ginger beer plant

    Hi
    Does anyone have a recipe for ginger beer? How do you make the plant?

    We're in Wollongong. Does anyone have a plant that you can share?
    jane

  • #2
    I love Ginger Beer, I've tried this 'plant' with some sucess.
    Also I make a beutiful Elderflower Champaigne, let me know i'll dig out receipe.
    This is recepie for Ginger beer,i just got it ofline. works for me could work for you.

    You need:

    50g fresh bakers yeast
    300ml water
    2tsp ground ginger
    2tsp sugar
    Method:

    Start a Ginger Beer plant by placing 50g of fresh bakers yeast in a jar with about 300ml of water, 2 teaspoons of ground ginger and 2 teaspoons of sugar.

    Feed the plant each day for the next 7 days by adding one teaspoon of sugar and one teaspoon of ground ginger.

    Strain the mixture through fine muslin (keep the sediment) and reserve the liquid. Dissolve 450g of sugar in 600ml of boiling water. When cool, add the juice of two lemons and the reserved liquid and make up the volume to 4½ litres.

    Bottle, keep for one week, then, either drink quickly or keep refrigerated as it tends to become livelier with age.

    Restart the plant by dividing the sediment into two parts and placing each half into a jar with 300ml of water. You now have two plants to feed as above. If one plant is enough, give one away
    'The best fertilizer is the gardener's shadow.'
    Masanobu Fukuoka

    'People thought I was talking about gardens - few realised we were selling the softest form of total revolution. Self-reliance is seditious.'
    Bill Mollison.

    Comment


    • #3
      Do you want to make hard (alcoholic) ginger beer or soft (very low alcohol - around 0.5%) Jane?

      How much fridge storage space can you devote to ginger beer (say in terms of quantity of 1.25ltr plastic bottles or beer bottles)?
      The real path to natural farming requires that a person know what unaltered nature is, so that he or she can instinctively understand what needs to be done—and what must not be done—to work in harmony with its processes. - Masanobu Fukuoka

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      • #4
        THANKS pULSE

        I MADE UP YOUR RECEPIE WITH SOME SUCCESS, BUT ALSO WE NOW SPORT A HOLE IN THE wall as one bottle blew itself up.

        This has stopped our production for the time.

        thank you for your replies
        jane
        jane

        Comment


        • #5
          :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

          God that is such a reminder of my past....we had to stop ginger beer production when my step dad nearly lost an eye from exploding bottles....mum was so pissed off at always cleaning up the sticky mess....I love the flavour but the volatility of the beast is just too scarey!

          Bummer Jane....
          kathleenmc......yes......we......can

          http://permaculturedearth.blogspot.com

          http://www.lusciouslandscapes.com

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          • #6
            Hi Jane,
            I bottle my ginger beer in 2 litre soft drink bottles and so far (over two years) have not had an explosion. My current batch was bottled on the 18th of March and I do not refrigerate until I open a bottle. ( I try to wait at least three weeks) My recipe is very similar to the previous one mentioned and although I use less yeast it is very effervescent. If you would like more info. I can email my recipe.
            Regards,
            Maree

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by jane
              THANKS pULSE

              I MADE UP YOUR RECEPIE WITH SOME SUCCESS, BUT ALSO WE NOW SPORT A HOLE IN THE wall as one bottle blew itself up.

              This has stopped our production for the time.

              thank you for your replies
              jane

              Well Jane, I could have prevented you from having that experience if you'd responded to my questions above. :wink:
              The real path to natural farming requires that a person know what unaltered nature is, so that he or she can instinctively understand what needs to be done—and what must not be done—to work in harmony with its processes. - Masanobu Fukuoka

              Comment


              • #8
                Jez,
                Can u give me some info. on making hard ginger beer. I really like my low alcohol stuff and would continue to make this (I have kids), but I would also like to attempt to make some alcoholic ginger beer. I assume I would need to buy a fermenter?; but could you tell me what other equipment, etc. that I would need. Would be very grateful for any info/advice.
                Kindest regards,
                Maree

                Comment


                • #9
                  Sure, no problem Maree, I'm a bit strapped for time tonight but I'll get to it over the next couple of days - check back soon.
                  The real path to natural farming requires that a person know what unaltered nature is, so that he or she can instinctively understand what needs to be done—and what must not be done—to work in harmony with its processes. - Masanobu Fukuoka

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Thanks heaps, Jez. No hurry at all - whenever will do. Have recently retired (early) to care for disabled twins and am having lots of fun trying to make all the things I didn't have time for., eg., yoghurt, cheese, etc. Am having great success - beginner's luck, no doubt - lol - I LOVE this site!
                    Thanks again,
                    Regards,
                    Maree

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      That's really great Maree - it sounds like you are having a lot of fun exploring and making the most of your newly found free time.

                      Yes, you do need a fermenter with an airlock to make alcoholic ginger beer. From there you can decide whether you want a tap (the other option is an auto-syphon), and whether you just want to use a tube from the tap to the bottle or an auto bottler - either is ok for ginger beer, as long as if you use a tube you are careful to have it only slightly above the bottom of the bottle to prevent 'splashing' (which will lead to greater oxygenation and wild airborn yeast introduction). An auto bottler only releases the fluid in a measured trickle when it makes direct contact with the bottom of the bottle.

                      With 'soft' gb you can mostly get away with doing it in a lidless container (usually with a towel over it) because the rising carbon dioxide prevents wild airborn yeasts from drifting in when you take the towel off and check the brew, and because fermentation is not as furious as it is with hard gb. Also, soft gb is much harder to notice a contaminated taste (from airborn yeasts) in than beer, which should always be brewed in a fermenter for decent results.

                      As you'll already know, you can bottle gb into plastic containers and other than a bit of bulging, even if it is not quite fully fermented things won't become disastrous. The less fermentation has been completed in the bucket or fermenter, the more (subject to temps above around 14C and above) it will ferment in the bottle. If you're using glass with a fixed lid (i.e. not a cork), unfinished fermentation can mean you end up with a major disaster. :lol:

                      You can also blow up plastic bottles, but it's much harder - you have to bottle way too early and then let it sit at 14C or above. Glass is great for taste and long term storage, but it's nowhere near as forgiving. :wink:

                      Ok, so back to alcoholic ginger beer, you want it to ferment as fully as possible to use up all the sugars and convert them to alcohol. Fermentation can be slow over the final few days, so it becomes much less practical to do it without an airtight fermenter and an airlock - the slower the rate of fermentation, the more chance airborn yeasts have to invade the brew as less carbon dioxide is rising to prevent them.

                      The only major ingredient difference between soft and hard ginger beer is how much sugar/dextrose/malt you add. Roughly speaking, most ale yeasts (which are what is generally used for ginger beer - that's why it's often called 'ginger ale') will give you 2.7%ABV (alcohol by volume) for each kilo of sugar added. A kilo of dextrose will generally be similar. The natural sugar in ginger will give you an extra 0.2-08%ABV - depending on how much etc. Beyond about 2 kilos of sugar you're pushing it unless you want to get into some more complex brewing methods and do some serious experimentation.

                      I'll expand on this further soon with a bit of extra info and some recipes etc.
                      The real path to natural farming requires that a person know what unaltered nature is, so that he or she can instinctively understand what needs to be done—and what must not be done—to work in harmony with its processes. - Masanobu Fukuoka

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Jez,
                        Thank you very much - excellent instructions! I am going to buy a fermenter and "have a go"!
                        Once again, thanks heaps.
                        Maree

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I was hoping to have added to this by now Maree...unfortunately the hard drive on my computer packed it in the other day,so I've now got quite a bit of work to do in my free time getting things back to normal.

                          It may take a few days to a week or so, but I will add some more.
                          The real path to natural farming requires that a person know what unaltered nature is, so that he or she can instinctively understand what needs to be done—and what must not be done—to work in harmony with its processes. - Masanobu Fukuoka

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            G'day again Maree,

                            Sorry it took me so long to get back to this...time has been very scarce lately!

                            Just wanted to add a few things:

                            Liquid yeast starters have major advantages over dry yeasts...I'm gonna save some typing and direct you here (Click To View) for all the info you'll need on them. Just bear in mind that you probably want an ale yeast for the best ginger beer, so if you're going to harvest some yeast from a commercial beer, an ale would probably be best - lager yeasts require a temperature which is often too low for home production in Australian climate. If you're going to use a dry yeast, SAFAle is about the best around, but it costs a few dollars.

                            As I mentioned before, you can stop the fermentation process simply by chilling the bottles in the fridge. For a sweeter ginger beer (with less alcohol), chill earlier. For a dry ginger beer with higher alcohol, let it ferment longer.

                            Some common ingredient twists for ginger beers are: using dextrose, raw, or brown sugar instead of white, refined sugar; substituting some sugar with maple syrup and/or one of the various types of malt; adding a pinch of cayenne pepper (increases the ginger bite); adding a pinch of cream of tartar; adding citrus (lemon or orange zest and/or juice is the most common).

                            Finally, bear in mind you can make gb just from juicing fresh ginger root if you're going to be adding yeast to make alcoholic gb anyway.

                            *I was going to add some recipes, but I realised just prior to posting that all the alcoholic ones I had were bookmarks from a site which no longer exists. Someday when I get some more spare time I'll try to hunt them down again...I'm sure they were moved somewhere, just a question of where. :wink:
                            The real path to natural farming requires that a person know what unaltered nature is, so that he or she can instinctively understand what needs to be done—and what must not be done—to work in harmony with its processes. - Masanobu Fukuoka

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              hi
                              found a soft ginger beer recipe online, followed it but still went wrong, it tasted like flat sugared water, yuk ,,did i do something wrong or was recipe wrong, one big difference between yours and this is the amont of yeast. appreciate feedback .cheers notknowy
                              recipe said
                              You need:
                              Yeast, ground ginger, sugar, water.

                              Plant:
                              • ½ teaspoon dried yeast
                              • 1 rounded teaspoon ground ginger
                              • 1 rounded teaspoon sugar
                              • 1 cup lukewarm water
                              Method:
                              Mix all together in a jar, cover with a piece of muslin and secure with a rubber band.
                              Each day for the next week, add 1 teaspoon sugar and 1 teaspoon ground ginger.
                              The plant: Divide the plant left in the muslin into two halves. Place one of these in a glass jar with a cup of warm water. Then next day start feeding as before, that is, one teaspoon of ginger and one of sugar each day. The other half of the plant can be discarded, or you can have two plants 'on the go'.
                              To make up the Ginger Beer:
                              For the syrup, mix together:
                              • 4 cups of sugar
                              • 24 cups of warm water
                              • ½ cup strained lemon juice

                              Strain the ginger beer plant through two layers of muslin.
                              Pour the resulting liquid into the syrup and mix well.
                              Bottle and seal. The ginger beer should be ready to drink by the end of a week.
                              May take 10 days for first one

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