Category: Peak Oil

How “Sustainability” Became “Sustained Growth”

Editor’s Preamble: In a prevous editorial life, I used to make a decent attempt at commentary for these large international events — those organised with some pretention towards shifting us onto a ‘sustainable path — but I no longer have the energy for it. Pinning our hopes on politicians’ plans for ‘greening the economy’ is a bit like using your digital alarm clock. The alarm rings, then we hit ‘snooze’ […]

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Coal Seam Gas – Music to Soothe the Mining Beast (28-30 June, 2012)

Editor’s Note: If you’re in the Northern Rivers area of NSW, Australia (or if you can otherwise make it!), please support this important initiative! Coal Seam Gas (CSG) mining, or ‘fracking’ (see here and here), has potential to impact adversely on the natural environment and community. In response to the threat of growth of the damaging CSG mining industry a troupe of volunteers based in Lismore, NSW has embarked on […]

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What Will Rio+20 Bring?

In a few days the international community will be meeting in Rio de Janeiro, to hold the most significant environmental conference since the Rio Earth Summit of 1992. As the planet’s ecosystems tremble under the weight of overconsumption, this conference surely provides one of few remaining opportunities for governments to take environmental issues seriously. Will the world’s leaders dare to think beyond the growth paradigm that lies at the root […]

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Rio+20: What Ecovillages Offer

It is the start of Rio+20, the UN Conference on Sustainable Development, and the Global Ecovillage Network has a strong contingent here from all over the world. We have erected a dome at the People’s Summit in Cupala dos Povos (Flamingo Park) and are providing a “Speaker’s Corner” for ecovillages, Transition Towns, Occupy, and others to strut their stuff. So what is it that ecovillages and permaculture bring to this […]

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Myth of Perpetual Growth is Killing America

Editor’s preamble: It’s refreshing and even somewhat reassuring when a major stock market website runs an article like the one below…. Everything you know about economics is wrong A stray dog stands on a rubbish dump at the seafront in Sidon, southern Lebanon. Yes, everything you know about economics is wrong. Dead wrong. Everything. The conclusions of economists are based on a fiction that distorts everything else. As a result […]

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Ted Trainer and the Simpler Way

Editor’s Note: To follow, I think, is a very important look at Ted Trainer’s work — one that broaches an oft-avoided but critically essential conversation. I must confess to only having read a single article from Ted Trainer previously, which I posted here, but from that article, and the document below, I sense that similar thought processes in my own experience, and Ted’s, have led to the similar conclusions. Some […]

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APC11 Presentation: Susan Krumdieck – Sustainable Transport and Urban Design

Susan Krumdieck, speaking at the Australasian Permaculture Conference (APC11) in Turangi, New Zealand, April 2012 Photo © PRI Susan Krumdieck is an Associate Professor working in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand. Originally gaining her PhD in the U.S.A., her home country, Susan decided to relocate to New Zealand, where her desires to be more proactive along sustainability lines would be less likely […]

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Global Oil Risks in the Early 21st Century

by Dean Fantazzini, Moscow School of Economics, Moscow State University, Moscow, Russia Abstract: The Deepwater Horizon incident demonstrated that most of the oil left is deep offshore or in other locations difficult to reach. Moreover, to obtain the oil remaining in currently producing reservoirs requires additional equipment and technology that comes at a higher price in both capital and energy. In this regard, the physical limitations on producing ever-increasing quantities […]

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Pietro Zucchetti Interviews Rob Hopkins

This is an interview with Rob Hopkins, the founder of the Transition Town movement founded in Totnes, United Kingdom. The interview is about what Transition Towns mean, and how he came up with this idea as a permaculture teacher. The interview also covers how is this concept important now, during the present global crisis, and how the Transition Town movement can get involved in educating people to cope with a […]

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Suburban Permaculture with Janet Barocco and Richard Heinberg

Richard Heinberg not only talks the talk, but also walks the walk, as we get to see in the video at bottom. Peak Moment host, Janaia Donaldson, visits Heinberg and his partner Janet Barocco in their own venture in sustainable living in suburban Santa Rosa, California. When they bought the place in 2001 it was a complete disaster, Richard tells Janaia, but it had advantages that drew them to it, […]

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William Kamkwamba – The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind

When we think of wind power, we most likely think either of the huge wind farms now dotted across the globe, or the good ol’ country windmills that have been the backbone of our outback stations’ water supply. But how often do we hear of windmills being built from scratch, let alone in a poor African nation, such as Malawi? William Kamkwamba did just this, and we can share his […]

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Sail Power Reborn – Transporting Local Goods by Boat

Peak Moment host Janaia Donaldson joins Fulvio Casali, Kathy Pelish and Alex Tokar, co-founders of the Salish Sea Trading Cooperative, on the deck of the sailboat Soliton, docked in Ballard, near Seattle, Washington. The Salish Sea Trading Cooperative have teamed up with Nash’s organic produce in Sequim, where twice a month they arrive by sailboat, to collect the produce, before heading back to Ballard for distribution to the local community […]

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