Category: Food Shortages

A Gathering of Silverbacks: Age of Limits 2014

Whenever such large shifts in temperature occurred in Earth’s history, they were not gradual but came in lurches. Resilience is the capacity of a system to continue providing essential functions after receiving that kind of shock. The first known use of the Infinite Improbability Drive was initiated by Zaphod Beeblebrox and Trillian on the starship Heart of Gold. Its major consequence was rescuing Arthur Dent and Ford Prefect from open […]

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Permaculture Around Latin America – Dominican Republic

The Dominican Republic is in the Caribbean — one half of Isla La Hispaniola, along with Haiti. The Dominican Republic Encyclopedic Dictionary of the Environment can inform us of some of the environmental challenges Dominicana faces, such as increasing deforestation and soil erosion (15% of the country’s soil is overused). Many of these issues are shared with their immediate neighbor, Haiti, which is significantly more deforested. Nathan C. McClintock points […]

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Democracy and Diversity Can Mend Broken Food Systems – Final Diagnosis from UN Right to Food Expert

GENEVA – The United Nations Special Rapporteur on the right to food, Olivier De Schutter, today called for the world’s food systems to be radically and democratically redesigned to ensure the human right to adequate food and freedom from hunger. “The eradication of hunger and malnutrition is an achievable goal. However, it will not be enough to refine the logic of our food systems – it must instead be reversed,” […]

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Sandbar Cropping in Bangladesh

Bangladesh, home for one of the largest deltas in the world, is facing the adverse effects of climate change with riverbank erosion and flood water inundation during the annual monsoon. This has resulted in loss of agriculture crops, livestock and homesteads. The amount of cultivable land is reducing every year in an ever-changing landscape. Sandbar cropping has made a positive impact in converting these unfertile barren sandbars into food producing […]

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Exploring Sustainable Livelihoods in Laikipia (Kenya)

Elin Lindhagen, Director, PRI-Kenya Some members of the women’s group Since it started in 2013, the Laikipia Permaculture Project in Kenya has rapidly grown with the help of the inexhaustible passion of Joseph Lentunyoi, founder and manager of the project. From the first women’s group, Nabulu, which approached the newly established Laikipia Permaculture Centre, wanting help and advice on how to grow their aloe, combat pests, improve productivity and also […]

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10 Ways to Prepare for a Post-Oil Society

The best way to feel hopeful for the future is to prepare for it. The best way to feel hopeful about our looming energy crisis is to get active now and prepare for living arrangements in a post-oil society. Out in the public arena, people frequently twang on me for being "Mister Gloom’n’doom," or for "not offering any solutions" to our looming energy crisis. So, for those of you who […]

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The Biogas Disaster

How the perverse consequences of a great idea are destroying the natural world. In principle it’s a brilliant solution. Instead of leaving food waste and sewage and animal manure to decay in the open air, releasing methane which contributes to global warming, you can contain it, use micro-organisms to digest it, and capture the gas. Biogas from anaerobic digestion could solve several problems at once. As well as a couple […]

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A “Special Period” in the Mid-Hudson Valley Feeds the New York Local Food Renaissance (USA)

Local squash, like the ones pictured here, are frozen and consumed through the winter by Farm to Table Co-Packers. The families in my bioregion, the mid-Hudson Valley of New York (90 miles north of New York city), have been coping well with increasing food prices and sourcing food supplies as we face peak oil. This runs counter to the popular image circulating online showing families and the food they consume […]

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Can the World Feed China?

by Lester R. Brown, Earth Policy Institute Slim, healthy, happy bovines promote a ‘hip’ new McDonald’s meat based diet to Chinese consumers from billboards across the country Overnight, China has become a leading world grain importer, set to buy a staggering 22 million tons in the 2013–14 trade year, according to the latest U.S. Department of Agriculture projections. As recently as 2006 — just eight years ago — China had […]

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Phosphorous Starvation Threatens the World

A fully referenced version of this paper is posted on ISIS members website and is otherwise available for download here. The world is running short of phosphate ore for chemical fertilizers; recovering phosphate from waste and reducing phosphate use in phosphate rich countries can alleviate the shortage and simultaneously prevent environmental pollution. by Prof Joe Cummins Phosphorus a limiting nutrient Earth seems to be growing sicker every year along with […]

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Wake up Before it is Too Late – Make Agriculture Truly Sustainable Now for Food Security in a Changing Climate

Click to download (5mb PDF) In late September of last year (2013) the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) put out the latest in their Trade and Environment Review series — titled Wake up Before it is Too Late: Make Agriculture Truly Sustainable Now for Food Security in a Changing Climate. Alert readers may already be aware of this document — as it was the springboard for a […]

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Crash on Demand? A Response to David Holmgren

D. Lange “Mr. Dougherty and kid. Warm Springs, Malheur County, Oregon” October 1939 David Holmgren, for whom I have the utmost respect, is best known as one of the co-originators of the permaculture concept. Permaculture is an ecological design method for regenerative agriculture, where the principles of natural systems are employed in order to create a self-sustaining means for food production while building soil fertility. I am increasingly involved with […]

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