Category: Biodiversity

An Embarrassment for Both Yale University and the New York Times: “To Save the Planet, Don’t Plant Trees”

Dr. Nadine Unger, an assistant professor of atmospheric chemistry at Yale, had an op-ed published in the Opinion Pages of the September 19, 2014 edition of the New York Times. Both the title of her piece and its analysis of the article’s focus — climate change — have drawn quite a response, as one would imagine. I don’t have much to add other than asking for those interested to review […]

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The Kink in the Human Brain

Pointless, joyless consumption is destroying our world of wonders. This is a moment at which anyone with the capacity for reflection should stop and wonder what we are doing. If the news that in the past 40 years the world has lost over 50% its vertebrate wildlife (mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians and fish) fails to tell us that there is something wrong with the way we live, it’s hard to […]

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Expanding Farmlands with Reduced Cropping

According to a new research findings, over the next 100 years due to climate change, land suitable for agriculture is going to expand by 5.4 million km2, particularly in the Northern Hemisphere at high latitudes in countries like Canada, China and Russia. However, further down in the Global South, especially in the tropical regions, along with reduction in suitable land there, will be a decrease in suitability for multiple cropping. […]

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Goats Better Than Chemicals for Curbing Invasive Marsh Grass (USA)

Periodic livestock grazing keeps invasive plant in check, helps restore views and biodiversity. This image shows goats in a fenced test plot eating invasive Phragmites australis marsh grass. Photo: Jennifer Brundage, Duke University DURHAM, N.C. — Herbivores, not herbicides, may be the most effective way to combat the spread of one of the most invasive plants now threatening East Coast salt marshes, a new Duke University-led study finds. Phragmites australis, […]

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Meet Mr. Glyphosate – a Case Study in Excess

Thanks to a reader for sending this along to us. I don’t normally like to publish posts that reflect negatively about a particular person (I can think of only one other instance when I have, and that was about the results of a man’s work, as is largely the case here), but I feel that the video above is such an example of sickening excess that it shouldn’t go unnoticed.

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How Roundup® Poisoned My Nature Reserve

A personal witness to the devastating demise of wild pollinators and other species as glyphosate herbicides increase in the environment. by Rosemary Mason MB ChB FRCA In March 2006, UK’s Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) announced the closure of its wildlife research centres [1], a decision opposed by 99% of 1 327 stakeholders. Monks Wood centre, which hosted BBC’s Spring Watch, pioneered work on DDT and pesticides in the 1960s, […]

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Alihuen: An Agrarian Conservation Story (Chile)

Click the ‘CC’ button to choose subtitles (English and French available) Alihuen means big tree in the language of the indigenous Mapuche peoples of Chile. When Jeroen Beuckels decided to settle in the rural Chepu province of Chiloe with his wife Grecia this name was not taken lightly, for the farmland which it would represent has undertaken massive transformation from pasture to thriving forest.

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The British Thermopylae – and the Case for Reintroducing Big Cats, a Weird and Wonderful Tale

Y Gododdin is one of the few surviving accounts by the Britons of what the Anglo-Saxons did to them. It tells the story of what may have been the last stand in England of the Gododdin – the tribes of the Hen Ogledd, or Old North – in 598AD. A force of 300 warriors – the British version of the defenders of Thermopylae – took on a far greater army […]

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Crash on Demand – or Rapid Transition?

The Arctic Death Spiral and the Methane Time Bomb (Duration: 1:11:11) Please watch before continuing with the article. Can we talk about transition, please? Regular readers will have noted the semi-recent flurry of conversations over ‘crashing’ the system (if not, see here, here, here, here and here) and possible pathways to transition (see here and here). I’d like to see this conversation continued, as it is not insignificant. Hence this […]

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Planet Ocean (Documentary)

Duration: 1:28:59 "Planet Ocean" is an international documentary directed by Yann Arthus-Bertrand and Michael Pitiot. It has won "Best Cinematography Award, Blue Ocean Festival", "Audience Award, UK Green Film Festival" and "Monterey Bay Film Festival". Further Reading: An Ocean of Unknown Synthetic Sea

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Overfishing and More: Sea the Truth (video)

Background Sea the Truth is based on numerous scientific publications that examine the problems of seas and oceans. Below follows an overview of the themes addressed in the film and a brief explanation.

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Rashtriya Guni Mission – Promoting Traditional Medicinal Systems (India)

A mission to revive and promote traditional health care systems — Guni traditions — in India. Abstract Herbal medicine is the oldest form of healthcare known to mankind. Much of the medicinal use of plants developed through observations of wild animals, and by trial and error. As time went on, each tribe added the medicinal power of herbs in their area to its knowledge base. With industrialization and urbanization, this […]

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