Category: Irrigation

Can You Dig It? (WA, USA)

When life hands you (practically) free use of a trackhoe and a skidsteer, you just start digging until they pry them from your cold, muddy hands. by Laurie Branson The Curtain Drain Since the last update, the barn was built. It was delayed a few months due to unfortunate circumstances (our contractor suffered a small stroke but has fully recovered). With the delay we were unable to get our cover […]

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Swale Pathways (Tasmania, Australia)

by Good Life Permaculture Diagram of a traditional swale system Hobart is Australia’s second driest capital city (Adelaide’s first) so catching and storing water is often on my mind. Annually we get approximately 615mm, most of which arrives in the cooler months in and around Winter. During Summer our soils will dry out so ferociously that some soil types (including ours) will form cracks big enough to stick your hand […]

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Bamboo Drip Irrigation

Bamboo drip irrigation Introduction For more than 200 years tribal farmers of the north-eastern part of India, in the state of Megalaya, have been using an indigenous technique of bamboo drip irrigation to irrigate their plantation crops. These farmers of the Jaintia and Khasi hill areas have developed this system of tapping springs and stream water to grow betal leaves, black pepper and arecanut (3).

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Gains From Catching Rain In Drains: A Video Explanation Of The Rain Tank Project (Alberta, Canada)

This summer we installed our last major rainwater harvesting feature on our property. This rain tank is unique because it is integrated into our hardscape (patio) so it’s completely invisible to the untrained eye. In this video I talk about how it was built, how it fills, what we use it for and details on the drains and overflows. Take a look and let me know what you think!

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Fernglade Farm – Mid Summer (January) 2014 Update (Victoria, Australia)

The author, testing out the new sprinkler Australia is a country of extremes. One part can have floods, whilst the other part is having massive bushfires and heatwaves. In Southern Australia, where I am, summer comes with extreme heat and the potential of very little rain. So a lot of my summer activity involves dealing with the heat, lack of rainfall and the possibility of bushfires. Bushfires of the sort […]

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A Bicycle-Powered Water Pump (Malawi, Africa)

Sitting quietly at Butterfly, on the shores of Lake Malawi, it always struck me as odd when I would hear of people in the U.K. and the ‘leisure time’ they allotted themselves to keep fit. I found it stranger when people would want to do it while here on holiday, but each to their own. Living in a place like Malawi for over ten years you see the amount of […]

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Keyline Design as an Organizing Pattern for Permaculture Design, Part 2 (Sweden)

This is part 2 of a series of 5 articles looking at design considerations for our Cold Climate Permaculture site using the Keyline Scale of Permanence as a organizing framework, as well as an informative read for anyone interested. The aesthetic curves of the Keyline layout at ridgedale PERMACULTURE The previous article introduced some basic Keyline concepts and looked at the Site Specifics and how the Landform will influence the […]

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Desert Food Forest and Organic Commercial Production in Three Years – Update on Wadi Rum Consultancy (Jordan)

Outside the fence On August 6, 2010 Craig Mackintosh posted on my initial consultancy for the site I’m reporting on today. Three years and three months later, I can give an update on what has transpired since.

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Keyline Design as an Organizing Pattern for Permaculture Design, Part 1 (Sweden)

Having spent the past few years on a busy international schedule Richard Perkins has purchased a farm in Sweden where he is establishing ridgedale PERMACULTURE. This is the first of a series of five articles looking at design considerations for this cold climate Permaculture site using the Keyline Scale of Permanence as a organizing framework, as well as an informative read for anyone interested. The aesthetic curves of the Keyline […]

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India’s Dangerous ‘Food Bubble’

Editor’s Note: As is often the case with the Earth Policy Institute (EPI), crucial solutions are largely missing from the article below. I personally believe India’s population is not the problem, but land mismanagement and the prioritising of extractive short-term economic policies. The author, Lester Brown, only touches on solutions (a surface-level mention of water harvesting), instead of bringing it, and a wholesale restoration of the hydrological cycle, to front […]

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UNCCD Land for Life Award Winners for 2013 (India, Mexico, Africa): Practical, Doable, Magic

Educating small-holder farmers in India Every year the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification (UNCCD) presents awards and supportive prize-money to projects that have had a positive impact on combating desertification and restoring watersheds and the hydrological cycle. This year’s awards went to excellent projects in India, Mexico and Africa. Watch the fantastic videos below, from John D. Liu and the rest of the EEMP team, to find our more […]

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Gangi Setty and the Green Tree Foundation Project (India)

The Green Tree Foundation is a small non-profit organization that promotes permaculture techniques to local farmers in the Antapur district in Andra Pradesh, India. The organizations are devising solutions to alleviate serious water scarcity and eroded soil. However, it was Gangi Setty, the founder behind GTF, that made my trip to visit them most memorable. Gangi, a delightfully peculiar man, is an elementary school teacher, a full-time philosopher and a […]

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