Category: Water Conservation

Swale Pathways (Tasmania, Australia)

by Good Life Permaculture Diagram of a traditional swale system Hobart is Australia’s second driest capital city (Adelaide’s first) so catching and storing water is often on my mind. Annually we get approximately 615mm, most of which arrives in the cooler months in and around Winter. During Summer our soils will dry out so ferociously that some soil types (including ours) will form cracks big enough to stick your hand […]

Read More >
6 Comments

Bamboo Drip Irrigation

Bamboo drip irrigation Introduction For more than 200 years tribal farmers of the north-eastern part of India, in the state of Megalaya, have been using an indigenous technique of bamboo drip irrigation to irrigate their plantation crops. These farmers of the Jaintia and Khasi hill areas have developed this system of tapping springs and stream water to grow betal leaves, black pepper and arecanut (3).

Read More >
11 Comments

Under Cover Farmers (videos)

While researching cover cropping, I came across the video above, featuring an explanation from the Rodale Institute (U.S.) of their “No Till Roller Crimper” which is used to lay down the cover crop in a no till farming environment. Another video I uncovered (below) may be of interest to those pursuing permaculture practice in the larger scale farming environment. It is called “Under Cover Farmers” and investigates the cover cropping/no […]

Read More >
13 Comments

From Desert to Oasis in 4 Years (Jordan)

From-Desert-To-Oasis-in-4-Years

Geoff Lawton’s next video in his ever-expanding lineup takes you to Wadi Rum in Jordan where he consulted on a 10 acre organic farm and rebuilt their failing farm into a commercial success. Wadi Rum looks very much like your classic inhospitable desert region. It was used in the early 1960s as the backdrop set for the David Lean’s masterpiece, “Lawrence of Arabia.” If you’ve ever watched the movie as […]

Read More >
11 Comments

Dredged Up

Never mind the evidence, we’ll do something eye-catching. by George Monbiot For a moment that rarest of beasts, common sense, poked a nose out of its burrow and sniffed the air. Assailed by angry farmers demanding dredging in the Somerset levels, the environment secretary, Owen Paterson broke with protocol and said something sensible. Dredging is often not the best long term or economic solution and increased dredging of rivers on […]

Read More >
2 Comments

Wake up Before it is Too Late – Make Agriculture Truly Sustainable Now for Food Security in a Changing Climate

Click to download (5mb PDF) In late September of last year (2013) the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) put out the latest in their Trade and Environment Review series — titled Wake up Before it is Too Late: Make Agriculture Truly Sustainable Now for Food Security in a Changing Climate. Alert readers may already be aware of this document — as it was the springboard for a […]

Read More >
1 Comment

Keyline Design as an Organizing Pattern for Permaculture Design, Part 3 (Sweden)

This is the third of a series of articles looking at design considerations for our Cold Climate Permaculture site using the Keyline Scale of Permanence as a organizing framework, as well as an informative read for anyone interested.

Read More >
3 Comments

Drowning in Money

The hidden and remarkable story of why devastating floods keep happening. by George Monbiot We all know what’s gone wrong, or we think we do: not enough spending on flood defences. It’s true that the government’s cuts have exposed thousands of homes to greater risk, and that the cuts will become more dangerous as climate change kicks in(1).  But too little public spending is a small part of problem. It […]

Read More >
6 Comments

Laundry to Landscape Urban Greywater Installation: Greening the Sonoran Desert (Phoenix, Arizona)

This past November (2013), Watershed Management Group’s Green Living Co-op installed a "Laundry to Landscape" greywater system at my house. Enthusiastic co-op member ready to dig in! The Green Living Co-op runs on a barn-raising principle — basically you earn ‘hours’ by participating in other members’ projects.  After you’ve earned a set amount of hours, you qualify to host a workshop at your house.

Read More >
5 Comments

Keyline Design as an Organizing Pattern for Permaculture Design, Part 2 (Sweden)

This is part 2 of a series of 5 articles looking at design considerations for our Cold Climate Permaculture site using the Keyline Scale of Permanence as a organizing framework, as well as an informative read for anyone interested. The aesthetic curves of the Keyline layout at ridgedale PERMACULTURE The previous article introduced some basic Keyline concepts and looked at the Site Specifics and how the Landform will influence the […]

Read More >
2 Comments

Desert Food Forest and Organic Commercial Production in Three Years – Update on Wadi Rum Consultancy (Jordan)

50_img_31052012347

Outside the fence On August 6, 2010 Craig Mackintosh posted on my initial consultancy for the site I’m reporting on today. Three years and three months later, I can give an update on what has transpired since.

Read More >
47 Comments