Category: Water Conservation

Will We Really Have Water Forever

Will We Really Have Water Forever feat

Water truly is our most precious resource. We can go without food for up to thirty days. After three, we die of thirst because our bodies are almost 60% water. Babies are 75% water when they arrive. Water is life. When I was growing up in the 1960’s we thought the supply would last forever. Our kindred planet, Mars once had water in abundance, but now there appears to be […]

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Dryland Harvesting Home Hacks Sun, Rain, Food & Surroundings

Dryland Harvesting Home Hacks Sun, Rain, Food & Surroundings

When Brad Lancaster and his brother bought their home in downtown Tucson, the streetscape was a dusty place, devoid of trees or any vegetation. In 1996 Lancaster and his neighbors started an annual tree planting project, which up till now has resulted in over 1,400 native food-bearing trees being planted (usually with water-harvesting earthworks) in the neighborhood. In 2004, Lancaster augmented the street tree planting by using a 14-inch, gas […]

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Evolutions on Mr. Phiri’s Water-Harvesting Plantation, 1995–2016

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Earlier this year I had the opportunity to return to Zimbabwe and to the farm of some of my prime water-harvesting mentors, Mr. Zephaniah Phiri Maseko and his family. While in the region, I also visited the farms of many other innovative farmers who are enhancing their soils’ hydrology and fertility by cooperating with natural systems. In this blog entry, and some to follow, I will share some of the […]

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California Drought Update. A Way Forward

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California’s drought woes are well known. One Central Valley farmer thinks he might have at least a partial solution: flooding. While most farmers would steer clear of what seems like a counterintuitive plan, Cameron thinks the ambitious scheme could help put “millions of acre feet” of water back into the valley’s underground aquifer. Doing so in the winter, when El Nino runoff is in great supply, can help replenish the […]

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Groundwater Re-charging

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It’s a rainy Monsoon day. Today, it’s water, water everywhere, but soon there will not be a drop to drink. Think forward to April & May. Dry times ahead. And for some, water problems could come as early as February & March. Every monsoon, Goa receives around 3000mm of Monsoon rainwater. That’s a lot. In fact, it’s plenty, and more. So why are we faced with dwindling water tables, empty […]

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Comparing the Great Wall of China’s Contour Structure with That of a Water Harvesting System

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A permaculture enthusiast may want to inquire: how do the structures of both the Great Wall of China and Water Harvesting System relate A Brief history of the Great Wall Designated as a UNESCO World Heritage site in 1987, the Great Wall of China has always been the most visible symbol of power and influence of the past Chinese Empires. Initially built by Emperor Qin Shi Huang (c.259-210 B.C.) in […]

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Returning the Rain to Jordan

Alice has recently had this article published on www.alaraby.co.uk. “The most severe problem we face in Jordan is water scarcity,” says Mohammed Ayesh of the country’s Royal Botanic Gardens. “Most of our other problems stem from that – like food security, economic hardship, or the loss of biodiversity.” Jordan is among the world’s three most water scarce nations, according to a recent UN report, and is situated in one of […]

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Build your own PotBot Irrigation – An Example of Growing Permaculture Systems from First Principles

Introducing POTBOT irrigation – no it is not the name given to a tubby robot that does the mundane and time consuming task of watering. POTBOT is short for Plant Pot – Bottle dripper Irrigation. Batches of water are trickle released from the main water tank (for security) to batch storage then electronically released to fill in effect little water tanks all set at the same elevation around the garden. […]

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Water Management in Urban Areas

Water management in rural areas has always been an issue of great interest. On the one hand, water for human, stock and crop use is critical to living and producing. It is also a major factor in the very visible degradation of streams, the creation of gullies and changes to the natural flora and fauna associated with streams. The common farm-scale actions of clearing, road construction, ploughing, (over) grazing and […]

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Finding Ways to Prevent Water Waste and Save on Rising Produce Costs During California’s Historic Drought

THE CURRENT STATE OF CALIFORNIA’S UNPRECEDENTED DROUGHT Startling Statistics California is currently in its fourth year of a severe drought. The United States Drought Monitor estimates that over 90 percent of California is currently experiencing “severe” to “exceptional” drought conditions. For farmers, the increasing scarcity of water has been devastating. According to the American Farmland Trust, California is home to 27 million acres of cropland. Nine million of those acres […]

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Rehydrating the Earth: A New Paradigm For Water Management

This article was first published in the Holistic Science Journal Vol 2 Issue 4. To view the journal click here www.holisticsciencejournal.co.uk. The wars of the 21st century will be wars fought over water – these are the now famous words of former UN Secretary General Boutros Boutros-Ghali, words that a growing number of authors are repeating today. But what if, instead of providing the catalyst for war, water could instead […]

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Understanding Water Part 1: The Theory of Flow

It’ such a key part of our lives – indeed, all of life – that it can be said to be quite literally elementary; but much of the way in which this vital force is being used appears sometimes to lack some understanding of what water is, and how it behaves. A Fragile Resource? Much of current thinking (see for example 1) emphasises the fragility of our access to water […]

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