Category: Soil Rehabilitation

Empowering Pastoralists in Tanzania with a Free Gift of Nature

Fadhili Terri, via www.foodwatershelter.org.au Farming is a truly rewarding activity for those who are in love with nature. Being close to the land, watching your crops and animals grow, living off the fruits of your labour , this seems to be the dream of more and more people out there as they are not ready to lose opportunities, running around and of the experiencing daily stress. As any person knows […]

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It All Started with Geese

5 Tufted Romans, 6 American Buffs and one mixed breed when they were about a week old. It all started with the geese. That’s not to say that they were fault, just that their habits started me on a new line of thinking. The geese were a gift to myself for my birthday one year. I don’t usually do that but I wanted them and it made a good excuse. […]

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Low Cost Worm Farm ‘Tractors’ For Small Spaces

Worms may not have a backbone, but they are the backbone of our soil. In a suburban garden with no manure-providing animals, being able to dig into your composting worm farm for a handful of black gold is a real cost saver and loop closer. So giving some thought to how that worm farm fits into your overall Zone 1 system — as a time, effort and space-saving soil fertility […]

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Fred Kirschenmann: Soil – from Dirt to Lifeline (TED video)

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Fred Kirschenmann has been involved in sustainable agriculture and food issues for most of his life. He currently serves as both a Distinguished Fellow at the Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture at Iowa State University, and as President of the Stone Barns Center for Food and Agriculture in Pocantico Hills, New York. He also still provides management oversight of his family’s 2,600 acre organic farm in south central North Dakota. […]

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Permaculture for Pastoralists in the Jordan Valley – Part II

Note: If you haven’t already, you can read Part I here. A Dead Sea Valley family home with their typical front ‘lawn’. Photo © Craig Mackintosh The title may lead you to think we are talking about people who manage pasture or have access to wide areas of rangeland. In fact, we are talking about people whose parents and grandparents were nomadic pastoralists that ranged flocks of animals across vast […]

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Nitrogen: the Double-Edged Sword

Dutch clover cover crop between cabbage rows Nitrogen is a component of protein and DNA and as such, is essential to all living things. Prior to the Industrial Revolution, around 97% of the nitrogen supporting life on earth was fixed biologically. Over the last century, intensification of farming, coupled with a lack of understanding of soil microbial communities, has resulted in reduced biological activity and an increased application of industrially […]

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Phayao Permaculture Center – Soil Building Strategies (Thailand)

The Phayao Permaculture Center (PPC) is a two acre permaculture design implemented to be the retirement farm for myself and my Thai family. It is located in the wet/dry tropics at 19 degrees north latitude in Northern Thailand. Having taken the Permaculture Design Certificate (PDC) course with Bill Mollison on Maui, Hawaii in 1982, it has been my vision to retire on my own permaculture designed land. This came about […]

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The Secret Of El Dorado – Terra Preta

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Os-ujelkgw In this documentary a legendary civilization thought to be too good to be true on the basis of the stories told by the Spanish explorer Francisco de Orellana, is found to be a real part of history. We can separate fact from fiction here, in that the golden riverbanks the Spaniard told of were not golden with precious metal strewn along them, but with something far more precious — […]

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Black Magic: The Secrets of Amazonian Fertility

The great Amazon rainforest. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons Bones. Charcoal. Ash. Blood. Feces. Food waste. Pottery shards. Before I began my journey into permaculture and regenerative ecology, if you asked me why someone would gather and bury these things together, I would have guessed at some kind of disgusting voodoo magic ritual. But for those initiated into the alchemy of composting and soil generation, this is actually a recipe […]

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Guerilla Gardening in Rural Panama

A gnome (the author) in the Communal Garden Make no mistake, the war is on. The commodity is food, the source needs to be sustainable, and the community needs to know about it. If you are already into permaculture, or just gaining an interest, then congratulations and welcome to the peace-loving yet active front lines. We call it guerilla gardening.

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Report on 5-Day Permaculture Workshop for the Etse Fewus Herbalists Association in Fitch, North Soha, Ethiopia: Part 2

Continuing from Part 1. Sunday 21/09/14: Day 4 The group were very happy with the biole preparations we did on day 3. They were amazed that we could make fertilizer out of basic farmyard trash when they had all been paying though the nose for imported chemicals for the past years. So riding this wave of enthusiasm I hoped we would make good progress in covering the material today. Unfortunately […]

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Tiger Hill Permaculture: Phase 1, Water Harvesting Earthworks

In February 2011 I took over the farm, ‘Tiger Hill’, in Tasmania, Australia. The planets aligned at that time in my life as I had a deep desire to find a property that I could develop to get all of my experience and ideas toward Permaculture on the ground and create my long term vision of an educational community and demonstration site based on Permaculture design.

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