Category: Food Plants – Perennial

Conventional Vs. Organic Vs. The Future of Food

People are awakening to a vision where they can see themselves as less stressed, having more quality time to spend with family, and real food laced with nature’s nutrition. Our great grandparents and, for some, grandparents could have told you of a time when there was no such thing as a supermarket. As a point in fact it was not until 1915 that Vincent Astor came up with a ’mini […]

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Food from Perennial(ising) Plants in Temperate Climate Australia, for August 2013

Editor’s Note: I want to express my heartfelt thanks to Susan for taking the initiative for this excellent series, and, I’d also like to second Susan’s request for volunteers to continue it! There may also be individuals who would like to start a similar series for other climate zones. Either way, you’re encouraged to contact Susan, as outlined below, to find out how to proceed. This is the late Winter […]

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OrBio – a Cover Crop Strategy for Market Gardens

A bug’s eye view of the sky, from a stand of cover crop Photo © Craig Mackintosh A recent post by Australian permaculture aid worker, Miles Durand, writing from Lesotho, reminded me to share a method of growing vegetable crops alongside cover crops that I learned when I studied organic biological horticulture many years ago. In the context of the holistic soil science and natural pest control studies I was […]

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Fruits and Nuts: Our Cold-Climate Favorites (Massachusetts, USA)

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An excerpt from Paradise Lot: Two Plant Geeks, One Tenth of an Acre, and the Making of an Edible Garden Oasis in the City by Eric Toensmeier with contributions from Jonathan Bates Grapes August is the beginning of our fruit and nut harvest. Since we have little room for fruit and nut trees, we had to prioritize the species we most love to eat, with the prime fruit growing space […]

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Small Scale Nursery Applications: Reflections from Loping Coyote Farms Nursery (NV, USA)

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by Neil Bertrando , Eric Toensmeier Plant materials are a critical component of any homestead or agroecology site, and by using the permaculture design concept, we can figure out many yields to pattern into our management activities. I want to explore some opportunities presented by integrating a small scale nursery into the process of site development, based on my experiences in a high desert climate context on sites of <2 […]

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Of Apples and Earth Apples (Ireland)

by Ute Bohnsack August is a happy month, a time of abundance at the tail end of summer, the month that gives us the first apples and new potatoes. In Ireland ‘spuds’, somewhat more eloquently termed ‘pomme de terre’ by the French, are a staple food of course, but similarly apples to me are a staple I don’t like to be without. In my native German language they are generally […]

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Arracacha, The Perennial Root of the Andes

When I first moved to northern New South Wales to live and work at Zaytuna Farm as a nurseryman, I had to readjust my botanical eye to my new surroundings. What grew where and how? What were the predominant local natives? The commonly planted fruit trees? The commonly cultivated vegetables? Catching my eye almost immediately growing in the Zaytuna Farm ‘Urban Garden’ was a whole bed of lush green… something […]

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Winter at Tata Kaitawa, 2013 (New Zealand)

by Yvonne Collin Misty winter morning in the valley What winter? Have we had one and it has slipped by without making a noise? We have had a few cold and wet days here in the bush and the occasional frost after a clear night, but not like the winters we are used to having. We live in a deep valley, one of two valleys that meet at the bottom, […]

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Permaculture is Weaving Magic! (Maharashtra, India)

by Jyoti Deshpande, Chaitraban It has been almost three years, and, as Toby Hemenway says, the magic is happening! The trees are yielding shiny tasty food, the variety of weeds on the land is slowly reducing, the soil is a darker colour now and there are tons and tons of predatory insects patrolling the site.

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Maximum Yield Cropping System (MYCS)

There are many economic, social and environmental benefits to be gained by increasing the current yield from existing food production areas, including increased employment, food production and community food security, and most important, the prevention of clearing more forests for food production. Natural ecosystem services are essential for human existence, providing life support functions such as water and oxygen — and they are the models from which we can design […]

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Kat Chang’s Farm in Guangzhou (China)

This farm outside of Guangzhou turned out exactly to be what I was hoping; a place to garden, to write and to relax. Kat Chang, the manager of the farm, was a great host. She was relaxed, interesting to talk to, and respected my personal time. There was also an expectation that I would work for a few hours a day. Best of all, she was familiar with permaculture and […]

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Food from Perennial(ising) Plants in Temperate Climate Australia for July 2013

This is the mid-Winter post for the ongoing research project about perennial plants and self-perpetuating annual plants providing food in temperate climate Australia. The original article introducing this project, stating its aims, and providing participant instructions, can be found here. Growers are sending me information on a month-by-month basis, then this information is collated and published the following month. All previous posts from this series can be found by clicking […]

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