Category: Food Plants – Annual

Winter at Tata Kaitawa, 2013 (New Zealand)

by Yvonne Collin Misty winter morning in the valley What winter? Have we had one and it has slipped by without making a noise? We have had a few cold and wet days here in the bush and the occasional frost after a clear night, but not like the winters we are used to having. We live in a deep valley, one of two valleys that meet at the bottom, […]

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Permaculture is Weaving Magic! (Maharashtra, India)

by Jyoti Deshpande, Chaitraban It has been almost three years, and, as Toby Hemenway says, the magic is happening! The trees are yielding shiny tasty food, the variety of weeds on the land is slowly reducing, the soil is a darker colour now and there are tons and tons of predatory insects patrolling the site.

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Maximum Yield Cropping System (MYCS)

There are many economic, social and environmental benefits to be gained by increasing the current yield from existing food production areas, including increased employment, food production and community food security, and most important, the prevention of clearing more forests for food production. Natural ecosystem services are essential for human existence, providing life support functions such as water and oxygen — and they are the models from which we can design […]

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Kat Chang’s Farm in Guangzhou (China)

This farm outside of Guangzhou turned out exactly to be what I was hoping; a place to garden, to write and to relax. Kat Chang, the manager of the farm, was a great host. She was relaxed, interesting to talk to, and respected my personal time. There was also an expectation that I would work for a few hours a day. Best of all, she was familiar with permaculture and […]

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Food from Perennial(ising) Plants in Temperate Climate Australia for July 2013

This is the mid-Winter post for the ongoing research project about perennial plants and self-perpetuating annual plants providing food in temperate climate Australia. The original article introducing this project, stating its aims, and providing participant instructions, can be found here. Growers are sending me information on a month-by-month basis, then this information is collated and published the following month. All previous posts from this series can be found by clicking […]

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A Computer Geek Starts a Garden, Part II – We Are Chlorophyll Managers

Last night I ate a couple of dozen cherry tomatoes from my just-getting-started garden. A little pepper and salt and I was in tomato heaven. I was expecting them to taste a whole lot better than the supermarket ‘tomatoes‘ I’m otherwise forced to consume, and I was not at all disappointed. Indeed, every cell of my body almost seemed to shout "thank you!" The difference was like night and day. […]

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Controlling Garden Pests With Natural Remedies

Nature is a friend and not an enemy and we should aim to work together. Probably the most important lesson we have to learn is that trying to fight nature is foolish and to co-operate is common sense. When we co-operate, Nature helps to solve the problems, and the way forward can become clearer to us. If we observe Nature closely we are more inclined to find the answers. Garden […]

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Fernglade Farm – Winter 2013 Update (Australia)

The rains turned up here in Victoria, Australia, in April and then kept on pouring. So far this year has seen almost no rain over summer and then about 600mm (2 foot) since about the middle of Autumn. In addition to that, winter maximum temperatures have set new records (which date back to the 1860s). The climate here is turning strongly Mediterranean. As you’d expect, everything is growing strongly although […]

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Grain Yields Starting to Plateau

Editor’s Note: As regular readers will know, I don’t agree 100% with everything I post to the site. The article below, for example, has somewhat of a focus on fossil-fuel-based fertiliser, as the means to increasing yields. But, I put this piece up anyway, as the statistical information it contains on plateauing yields is an important one for all permaculturists (and all humans in general) to consider, acknowledge, and prepare […]

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Report on Permaculture Training in Dembe Dollo, Western Ethiopia (Part 2)

Continuing from: Report on Permaculture Training in Dembe Dollo, Western Ethiopia (Part 1) Community trainings in the third world present a bit of a different set of challenges from your average western group. The community members often have quite a wealth of indigenous knowledge on the methods and the species of the area – they know exactly which trees are used for what (goat forage, fencing, medicine, fibre, etc.), how […]

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Regenerating Rusinga Island (Lake Victoria, Kenya)

In January, 2013, I wrote an article titled, "Helping Small Farmers Help Themselves on Rusinga Island". In December of 2012, I came to Rusinga Island for the first time under the invitation of PRI Kenya to teach a PDC to women and men subsistence farmers. What emerged out of the PDC was a small group of farmers — sixteen members — organizing themselves and setting up their own association called […]

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Food from Perennial(ising) Plants in Temperate Climate Australia, for June 2013

This is the early Winter post for the ongoing research project about perennial plants and self-perpetuating annual plants providing food in temperate climate Australia. The original article introducing this project, stating its aims, and providing participant instructions, can be found here. Growers are sending me information on a month-by-month basis, then this information is collated and published the following month. All previous posts from this series can be found by […]

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