Category: Food Plants – Annual

Pasture Cropping: an Integrated Approach to Grain and Pasture Production

Harvesting oats as green native perennial pasture grows up between the cereal rows (Seis, 2006) Pasture cropping is a farmer-initiated land management system that seamlessly integrates cropping with pasture production, and allows grain growing to function as part of a truly perennial agriculture. Annual winter growing (C3) cereal crops are direct drilled into living summer growing (C4) perennial pasture grasses as the pasture sward enters the dormant phase of its […]

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Raised Beds and Soil Rehab with Yard Waste

Clean up Over the last two years, here in South West Pennsylvania, a snow and wind storm knocked down a few trees in the back yard. This provided both resources and opened up a nice hole in the canopy where I could put those resources to use. The first thing I wanted to do was collect all of the yard refuse, both to see what I had to work with […]

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Permaculture: a Path Toward a More Sustainable Amazon?

Originally published on Mongabay.com An Eco-Ola permaculture plot with yuca, beans, sacha inchi, bananas, charapitas, herba luisa, and moringa in the Peruvian Amazon. Communities living in and around tropical forests remain highly dependent on forest products, including nuts, resins, fruit and vegetables, oils, and medicinal plants. But relatively few of these products have been successfully commercialized in ways that generates sustained local benefits. When commercialization does happen, outsiders or a […]

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Perennial Plants and Permaculture

Rhubarb Currently, approximately 80% of the food crops grown in the world are annual plants, and it’s been this way for quite some time. Perennial plant food crops are pretty much in the minority in terms of how the human race derives its nutrition. Permaculture strongly emphasises the importance of using perennial plants in our food production systems. When we consider the permanent agriculture aspect of permaculture, it should be […]

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Geoff Lawton’s Zaytuna Farm Video Tour (Apr/May 2012) – Ten Years of (R)Evolutionary Design

Paradise Dam, April 2012, from the now-climaxing food forest Photos © Craig Mackintosh (unless otherwise indicated) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ASNVqSEEk1U?rel=0″ frameborder=”0″ allowfullscreen> Zaytuna Farm Video Tour, duration 41 minutes Note: Switch YouTube player to HD if your internet connection allows Having spent the last few years seeking to establish and assist projects worldwide, and hearing some readers requesting more info on our own permaculture base site, I thought it high time I take […]

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Plant Families – Patterns in Nature

Climbing bean flowers have only one axis of symmetry A practical thing botany teaches is too look at similarities and differences or patterns in plants. When growing vegetables you start to see resemblances between the plants and it can be useful to develop some general knowledge about how plant families are classified. I have found this knowledge particularly useful for:

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Getting Kids Into Gardening, Part IV: Creativity in the Garden

Inspiring our children to develop an enthusiasm for gardening is a wonderful gift we, as parents or caregivers, can give them. This theme revolves around using the garden and its produce as an outlet for creativity. The following ideas will hopefully help give you some starting points for helping your children make the most of the garden in a myriad of ways. Use just one idea, combine several, or come […]

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Following McDonalds’ Example Towards a Healthy Diet

Images copyright Cam Wilson 2012 Who would have thought we could follow McDonalds’ business model to get our kids to eat healthy food?

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Getting Kids Into Gardening, Part III: Creating a Resilience Garden

Hands-on experience in getting the most out of a garden is going to be an invaluable skill in the challenging times ahead and getting kids enthusiastically involved, in their early years, is important for their future resilience. Giving your garden (or part of it) a theme can help inspire children and this particular garden theme — a Resilience Garden — may particularly appeal to boys, which is not to say […]

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Food Forests, Part 3: Closing the Loop

Local legend around here has it that at some point in the past a guy by the colourful name of the “bush bandit” removed most of the topsoil from the land hereabouts and sold it off to householders in Melbourne for their gardens and lawns. Whether this story is true or not, I can only state for the record that when I purchased the block it had virtually no topsoil. […]

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Indigenous Land Management Practices in the USA (Videos)

I’ve been interested in indigenous land management for many years, but since the publication of M. Kat Anderson’s phenomenal Tending the Wild: Native American Knowledge and the Management of California’s Natural Resources I’ve been engaged in active research. This has included collaboration with the Woodbine Ecology Center and my work on a publication (read an excerpt here) for them about indigenous management in the prairie and Rocky Mountain regions where […]

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Our Seeds: Seeds Blong Yumi – Watch for Free

In September 2008 Seed Savers released their first film, “Our Seeds: Seeds Blong Yumi”, a 57 minute documentary that celebrates traditional food plants and the people that grow them. We have now released this documentary on the net for free viewing (with English audio and Portuguese subtitles — we will put French, Chinese and Japanese subtitled versions online in the future). Watch it now (or read more about it below […]

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