Category: General

Roselle

Hibiscus sabdariffa or roselle fruits

Striking, unusual, edible, and useful.  Those four words do well to describe Hibiscus sabdariffa – L., aka Roselle.  That small bit of information should be enough for anyone to consider planting this beauty in their garden, but to learn more, read on!   Roselle, can also go by the names hibiscus, Florida cranberry, flor de Jamaica, Jamaica sorrel, sour-sour, Queensland jelly plant, jelly okra, and many more.  Roselle is a […]

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How Traffic and Soil Compaction Affects Growth and Yields

How Traffic and Soil Compaction Affects Growth and Yields feat

As any farmer will tell you, the health of the soil is directly responsible for the health of a crop. More than just the essential nutrients and water, the roots of plants need air pockets and microorganisms in the soil as well. This allows the plants to be able to properly intake nutrients like nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K) available in the soil to grow large and strong. […]

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Learn About Permaculture From Award-Winning Engineer & Ecologist, Rob Avis.

2011.06-Nelson-PDC-435 - feat

WORKSHOPS OFFERED ACROSS SOUTHERN ONTARIO IN FEBRUARY 2017. ABOUT THIS ONE-DAY WORKSHOP: Maybe you’re looking to cut your energy use and invest in solar or wind power. Maybe you’re imagining what it would be like to keep backyard chickens, start composting your kitchen scraps or grow healthy food on your front lawn (or a year-round garden in your passive solar greenhouse). Maybe you’ve even got ambitions of reducing water consumption, […]

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Giving Classes on the Homestead

Homesteading Classes feat

Hosting classes on the homestead can make extra income while helping people that are interested in what you have to teach them. I really enjoy talking with people about all the things I do and the things I would like to experiment with. I also love networking and sharing information. Having classes on my homestead gives me a chance to make these connections. It’s also difficult to find homesteading type […]

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Nutrient Density for Real

vitamins & nutrients: eat your veggies

One of the things that we are trying to accomplish with permaculture is to take over the Earth, actually feed ourselves and our animals with the resources available that we can leverage. We all know that 3 main calorie sources are proteins, fats and sugars that is commercial meat, margarine and refined sugar for city dwellers and paddock grazed lamb, full fat butter we made and honey from our beehives. […]

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Aquaponics Green House

Koi swimming in a decorative pond.

My aquaponics system is the heartbeat of my hoop house. I created this system as an experiment which has been going on for over 2 years now with minimal intervention. I built this system to provide water to my soil in the hoop house. It used to get really dry since I rarely ever water it myself. I don’t like watering anything unnaturally (with my water hose). I only do […]

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Just Enough Is Plenty (Book Review)

USA - CIRCA 1967 : stamp printed in the USA shows Henry David Thoreau was an American author, poet, circa 1967

In my early twenties I came across Henry David Thoreau and attempted to read Walden.  I admit I struggled.  If only Just Enough Is Plenty was available then I am sure Thoreau’s concepts would have been much easier to grasp.  Samuel Alexander has written an excellent introduction to Thoreau’s works.  Just Enough Is Plenty: Thoreau’s Alternative Economics not only summarises Thoreau’s ideas it is also a pithy statement of Alexander’s work itself: it is short, […]

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Hügelkultur

hugelkultur feat

Hügelkultur is a German word that means mound culture or hill culture. This is a growing method that has been used for years, but was made popular by the greats like Geoff Lawton, Sepp Holzer, and (Wild man) Paul Wheaton. Hügelkultur is a process that mimics what happens in a forest on an annual basis. Trees fall, leaves fall, seeds get covered, winter and rains germinate: from death, life begins. […]

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Small Scale Composting

Compost pile with daisies

Organic waste comprises an estimated 20-40% of the solid waste stream that ends up in landfills. Organic matter breaks down slowly in landfills due to limited oxygen, which can contribute to methane gas production. Enter stage left: compost. Compost is the rich, black remnant of organic waste such as kitchen scraps combined with “brown” matter (i.e. soil, leaves); the result is beautiful fertilizer for your garden. Intentionally composting accelerates the […]

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Stay Busy with Winter Permaculture

Sunset over winter forest lake

Winter isn’t the signal for rest: it’s just the signal to get ready for spring. Any grower or farmer knows this fact. You will be looking at seed catalogs by the time Christmas comes and I will already feel behind. So, get ready to do some permaculture work in and out of your home! Don’t leave soil bare Winter gives you the time to walk around and observe your ground. […]

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Farming the Garden – The Curse of Abundance

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I remember pushing a mower over the grass, hot, sweaty, itchy, 4 hours every week from May to September. I hated every minute of it. The sun beating down as sweltering humidity arose from the freshly cut grass. From that first day I knew the grass would succumb, pushed to the edges, relegated to a bit player rather than the lead role. The sun would be tamed, shaded from below, […]

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