Category: Village Development

A “Special Period” in the Mid-Hudson Valley Feeds the New York Local Food Renaissance (USA)

Local squash, like the ones pictured here, are frozen and consumed through the winter by Farm to Table Co-Packers. The families in my bioregion, the mid-Hudson Valley of New York (90 miles north of New York city), have been coping well with increasing food prices and sourcing food supplies as we face peak oil. This runs counter to the popular image circulating online showing families and the food they consume […]

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A Response to: “Right Livelihood – How Can We All $upport One Another?”

Surplus citrus bounty gleaned by volunteers In “Right Livelihood – How Can We All $upport One Another?”, author Carolyn Payne-Gemmell brought up some limitations of a traditional “veggie swap” that excluded the ability to purchase products with currency. And while I understand that one of the main ideas behind swaps is to build community, like Carolyn, I actually believe that swaps can severely limit community-building and right livelihood, even if […]

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The Benefits of Permaculture Education and Sack Gardens in Kenya, East Africa

You may have previously read about the work of FoodWaterShelter in Tanzania, East Africa, where they use permaculture solutions to provide the food, water and energy needs of the vulnerable women and children at the Kesho Leo children’s village. And you may have heard about the successful English and Kiswahili PDCs that they have hosted with almost 90 graduates. Well now read a story from one of the world’s first […]

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Bhaskar Save, the Gandhi of Natural Farming

Sage of a minimalist farming system based on non-violence and all of nature’s biodiversity that produces in abundance with no chemical inputs. by Bharat Mansata Bhaskar Save, acclaimed ‘Gandhi of Natural Farming’, turned 92 on 27 January 2014, having inspired and mentored 3 generations of organic farmers. Masanobu Fukuoka, the legendary Japanese natural farmer, visited Save’s farm in 1996, and described it as “the best in the world”, ahead of […]

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Permaculture in the Cities – An Interview with Geoff Lawton

Photo © Craig Mackintosh Marcin Gerwin: Permaculture is currently hardly known in Poland. Could you explain what it is? Geoff Lawton: Permaculture is a design science. It’s a system that supplies all the needs of humanity — all the basic needs and all the intricate needs — in a way that also benefits the environment. It works from the intimate small space of human habitat right up to the broad, […]

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A “Pattern Language” for Women in Permaculture

Children planting pumpkins. Photo by Jeanine Carlson Though women receive the majority of all college degrees in the U.S., and are well represented in the work force, they are very under-represented in positions of high-level leadership. Most of the women I’ve encountered in permaculture note analogous patterns: often, women constitute 50% or more of the participants in PDCs, yet occupy disproportionately few of the positions of leadership and prominence in […]

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A Shorter Working Week is Possible

Click for full view Marcin Gerwin: It was predicted in the 1930 by the economist John Maynard Keynes that thanks to the technological innovations, people in the twenty-first century will not have to work more than 15 hours a week. But here we are in the twenty-first century and many people in the industrialized world are in a hurry all the time and they have very little free time left. […]

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Evolving Signs

I first got into permaculture in my late teens — being introduced to it by a friend who was also learning about it and working on an edible garden. It wasn’t a simple, house backyard garden, though, but part of a multi-cultural intentional community that was just starting out. While not an eco-community per se, this group was hard at work to commit to a more sustainable lifestyle, and gardening […]

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The Royal Buffalo Bank – Promoting Animal Traction

Water Buffalo have been a community staple throughout Southeast Asia for centuries, especially in Thailand where the largest agricultural export is rice. Not only are buffaloes used as animal traction, but they also provide sources of food, such as meat and milk, as well as producing copious amounts of dung which is used as fertilizer and as a fuel when dried. Until recent decades, Thailand had the highest water buffalo […]

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Why We Are a CSA Farm (Victoria, Australia)

by Peter Carlyon, Transition Farm As we are now supplying 80 families every week with produce from our farm, and trying to spread the word to more young people about growing food, it seems like a good time to write about what our CSA farm is all about – and what it is not. There are many variations on the models of CSA and numerous explanations of what CSA means… […]

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The Power of Local Unity: Small US Town Enacts Free Food Trade (Sedgewick, Maine, USA)

via NewsBeaconIreland Sedgwick, Maine, the first town in the US to legalize any kind of food transaction as free and legal in order to keep the right to produce raw milk, organic produce, free-range eggs, and more, is revolutionizing the way America keeps its food rights – including saying no to GMOs. In other words, it is the first town to declare food sovereignty while opposing both state and federal laws. The […]

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Right Livelihood – How Can We All $upport One Another?

The notion of Right Livelihood is an interesting subject and surprisingly, sometimes controversial. by Carolyn Payne-Gemmell So, what do I do with my time and how do I make a living? I am a permaculture designer and teacher, and I sell plants, seeds, produce and poultry. I would like to make my living entirely from these things; I would like all the money I make to come to me through […]

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