Ravindra Krishnamurthy

Ravindra Krishnamurthy is a freelance science writer covering science, tech, the environment, health, food, and culture.

Septic Tanks Aren’t Restraining Faecal Bacteria From Contaminating Waterways

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– A new study from Michigan State University refutes the long held perception that septic tanks can hold back faecal bacteria, as researchers trace back the bacteria in the water bodies to leaky septic tanks. This research work is the largest watershed study of its kind to date, involving taking samples from 64 river systems representing the watersheds in the Lower Peninsula of Michigan, USA. Professor Joan Rose from Department […]

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After the Rain, Wait Before You Harvest

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According to a new research finding published in the journal Applied and Environmental Microbiology, farmers should wait at least 24 hours to harvest, after a rain or irrigation event, to protect consumers from food borne illness. A growing body of evidences suggests that, there is strong link between foodborne outbreaks and fresh produce. In the United States it is reported that, 46 percent of the foodborne outbreaks between 1998 and […]

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Long-term Census Reveal Presence of Abundant Mammalian Community in the Chernobyl Nuclear Disaster Zone

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An international team of researchers have discovered thriving populations of wildlife in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone, bringing out the unique evidence of wildlife’s resilience in the face of chronic radiation stress. Teeming with moose, elk, roe deer, red deer, wild boar, and wolves, the Chernobyl site after nearly 30 years of chronic radiation exposure looks more like a nature preserve, than as a disaster zone. A fire and an explosion […]

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Vertical Farming: Feeding the Cities of the Future?

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The future of urban farming is no more outdoor, but indoor and vertical. (Image source: Sky Greens) The vertical farming concept took birth in 1999, as an idea in Dr. Dickson Despommier class on medical ecology, in Columbia University. Despommier defines a vertical farm as any building, which grows food inside of it and, which is taller than a single storey. Employing closed-loop agricultural technology, all the water and nutrients […]

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Charting The Sun’s Motion In Relation To Your Home And Permaculture Site

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Image source: NREL.gov Understanding the sun’s motion relative to a site is an important aspect of a good permaculture design, as various elements like plants, animals and solar devices depend on sun for their functionality. A good appreciation of the earth’s rotation about its axis, its revolution around the sun and the consequences of these motions on the sun’s position and availability at a given location on the earth’s surface, […]

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Are Green Buildings Healthier Buildings?

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– Green buildings are not just better for environment but are also beneficial for its occupant’s health. It’s well known that, green buildings reduce the impact on the environment by conserving water and energy, and by minimizing the disturbances to the local surroundings. But, what is less known and less recognized is the fact that, green buildings positively influence the human health, well-being and productivity. They influence directly at the […]

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Storing Energy by Gravity

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– A simple and efficient way for large scale and long duration energy storage. Renewable energy technologies have come a long way since the first solar panels and wind turbines were built to harness the energy from sun and wind to meet the ever increasing energy demands of mankind. Advancements in renewable technologies and mushrooming of bigger and larger wind and solar farms are slowly reducing the unit cost of […]

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Syrian War Compels To Open The Doomsday Seed Vault For First Withdrawal

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Researchers from ICARDA, have requested for the backup seeds deposited in the Svalbard Global Seed Vault in Norway, to restart their collection after the primary gene bank in Aleppo got damaged due to Syria’s civil war. It’s barely been 8 years since the construction of the world’s doomsday seed vault in 2008, in a frigid Arctic mountainside on the Norwegian island of Spitsbergen, that the first ever request for withdrawal […]

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A Walk in Nature – What’s in it for my Mind?

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With increased urbanization and demographic shift from rural to urban areas, more and more people are getting alienated from nature. At the same time, with each passing year, the number of people taking medication or visiting psychiatrist due to depression, mood disorder and other mental illness is on a steep rise. Is there a link between our mental health and nature? If so, how does nature influence an individual’s mood […]

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Necessity Turns On the Innovative Side in Plants

-Extreme nutrient scarcity pushes plant roots in Australian kwongan bushlands to cook up ingenious strategies to survive For a general onlooker, the Australian Outback is nothing more than a bland empty void with low scrubs and bushes. But the kwongan bushland found in the south-west Australia has an unusually rich biodiversity even though subsisting on some of the world’s most infertile soils. In fact, the soil is so barren, that […]

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Power of Termite Mounds to Hold-back Deserts

Fungus-growing termites from the genus Odontotermes. Photo by Robert Pringle, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology. What outwardly looks like thousands of termites forming a complex system of tunnels, are, in fact, also creating an oasis for life to survive, sustain and thrive. Unknown to them their mounds prevent the advancement of deserts into drylands and semi-arid regions and make the land more resilient to climate change. Termite mounds act […]

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Expanding Farmlands with Reduced Cropping

According to a new research findings, over the next 100 years due to climate change, land suitable for agriculture is going to expand by 5.4 million km2, particularly in the Northern Hemisphere at high latitudes in countries like Canada, China and Russia. However, further down in the Global South, especially in the tropical regions, along with reduction in suitable land there, will be a decrease in suitability for multiple cropping. […]

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