Jonathon Engels

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The financially unfortunate combination of travel enthusiast, freelance writer, and vegan gardener, Jonathon Engels whittled and whistled himself into a life that gives him cause to continually scribble about it. He has lived as an expat for over a decade, worked in nearly a dozen countries, and visited dozens of others in the meantime, subjecting the planet to a fiery mix of permaculture, music, and plant-based cooking. More of his work can be found at Jonathon Engels: A Life About.

Designing a Lifestyle, Not Just a Garden

Ladybug (Courtesy of Anderson Mancini)

Implementing a permaculture design is much more than building a garden. It’s also more than a house that utilizes passive solar energy or barrels to catch rooftop runoff. While these things often are incorporated into permaculture plans, the practice itself is getting at something much deeper. It’s redesigning the way we live. Growing at least some of our own food is a step in a different direction from the mass […]

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Simple Ways to Conserve Water When Design Hasn’t Done It

Spider's Laundry (Courtesy of Petras Gagilas)

Managing water on a property is often at the forefront of permaculture design. Not only is there major focus on utilizing the landscape to make the most of weather and landscape supplied water, but also sustainable design dictates that we utilize gray water and minimize black “waste” water, which causes contamination, resource depletion, and health problems. In a perfect world, where all of our homes were designed thoughtfully with environment […]

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Remembering Bill Mollison, the Man I Never Knew

Chatting with Bill Mollison (Courtesy of Nicolás Boullosa)

I first encountered Bill Mollison in Nicaragua through Permaculture One, without even really stopping to notice his name, setting aside that book in order to read something from another friend I’ve never met, John Seymour, whose book The New Complete Book of Self-Sufficiency: The Class Guide of Realists and Dreamers captured me for the next month (It is also a fantastic book). By the time I’d finished it that December, […]

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Another Yule Log

Sleigh Rides 25

My wife Emma is a bit of a holiday junkie, her already notably high energy level rising even higher as the calendar ticks nearer to year’s end. We have certain rules, like No Christmas movies before December, to try to curb the enthusiasm until (what I have insisted is) an appropriate time. While she has obliged my assessment, it has only meant that her engine is fully revved by the […]

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Reducing Your Footprint When You Haven’t Built a Permaculture Site from the Ground Up

Reducing Your Footprint Feat

In the ideal world of most budding permaculture enthusiasts, which I still consider myself, we would have pieces of land sizeable enough to begin the adventure of a lifetime. We would be designing our own energy-efficient homes with passive solar heating in the winter and deciduous vines clambering around to keep the sun off in the summer. We would have the space for luscious gardens and food forests to grow […]

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Learning What the Dendritic Pattern Is (It Looks Like a Tree) and Applying It to Design

Dendritic Tree (romana klee)

Recently, I’ve been working my way through Geoff Lawton’s new online course, in particular chapter four, which concentrates on Pattern Understanding, as found in Bill Mollison’s Permaculture: A Designer’s Manual. It’s a topic that I do enjoy, though it sometimes feels a bit steeped in jargon, words formerly unfamiliar to me—tessellation and dendritic—appearing again and again. However, it’s the later, the dendritic pattern, that has recently captivated me, and I […]

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20 Quick-Producing Perennial Fruit Trees, Vines, Bushes, and Grasses

Serviceberries (Courtesy of RichardBH)

Quick is a relative term, especially when it comes to fruit, but what we’ll generally boil down to is in this article is some form of production in three years or less. While three years is certainly longer than it takes to grow some green beans and tomatoes, in the scheme of creating a perennial food forest that will provide for years to come, it’s nothing. What’s more, with this […]

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How and Why to Rotate Your Annual Crops

Veggies

Sure enough the bulk of us permies are working to establish perennial sources of food, cultivating food forests for high yields with low inputs. Nevertheless, annual food crops are often what our kitchen gardens are chiefly comprised of. It’s no big shock, really, as that has been what most of us have grown up eating, enjoy the flavor of, and thus want to grow. No doubt, we should be cultivating […]

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Building Ponds & Talking Liners

The pond looking over the veg plot

We all know that harvesting and storing rainwater is a huge part of designing a garden, and while swales are super functional and a fantastic way to hydrate a landscape, I—like many others—dream of an area replete with ponds. I want those permanent water features to attract wildlife, to swim in, and to use for irrigation if and when that’s necessary. Consequently, in daydreaming of some day soon owning a […]

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Donald Trump for One United People?

Donald Trump for One United feat

So it has come to be that Donald Trump is the president-elect of the United States, yet the world has not ceased to spin and the rains—one assumes—will still fall. We still have to eat, we still need shelter, we still long to commune, and the earth is still all we’ve got to provide all these things. It would be a lie for me to say that I believe this president-elect will be a positive one for the planet.

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The US Election, Standing Rock, Before the Flood, and How It All Ties in to the Permaculture Movement

Albany Wind Farm

Some time ago I wrote an article about permaculture as a political act, and as an idea, it was one of the more inciting that I’ve shared on Permaculture News. Many people wish to keep permaculture out of the political sphere, to view the goings on of the world as something we each address individually, not as a movement. There seems to be a fear, as seems often the case […]

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How Plant-based Permaculture Is Possible

Eggplant

I get laughed at a lot. It’s frequent enough that, when I tell people of my intention to build a permaculture system without using domesticated animals, I sort of give a preemptive grin. While I believe most permies mean well in advising me, most seem pretty dead-set on the idea that a vegan permaculture garden just can’t work. In a lot of ways, I won’t lie, the proposition scares me, […]

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