Paul Stamets – How Mushrooms Can Save Bees & Our Food Supply | Bioneers

In this video, visionary mycological researcher/inventor, Paul Stamets reveals new ground breaking research at the 2014 Bioneers annual conference. Paul illuminates how fungi, particularly mushrooms, offer uniquely powerful, practical solutions we can implement now, to boost the biosphere’s immune system and equip us with benign breakthrough mycotechnologies to accelerate the transition to a restored world.

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Paul systematically delves into old growth forests, how chemical compounds in the fungi are beneficial to bees and concludes with an empowering two minute summation of his philosophy about his role in the system as a whole.

Since 1990, Bioneers has acted as a fertile hub of social and scientific innovators with practical and visionary solutions for the world’s most pressing environmental and social challenges.

To experience talks like this, please join us at the Bioneers National Conference each October, and regional Bioneers Resilient Community Network gatherings held nationwide throughout the year.

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17 thoughts on “Paul Stamets – How Mushrooms Can Save Bees & Our Food Supply | Bioneers

  1. I am a first year sheep farmer. A bee keeper organised to keep his bees on my land for several months while I spread manure and several sheep died. The bees astounded me on that they would visit the manure and also the rotting corpses. I now ponder if there were mycellium growing to attract the bees.

  2. I have noticed dragonflies strangely and consistently attracted to piled sticks in my garden. I thought they might be eating mites or small organisms i couldnt see, but pauls work has made me question are they doing the same as the bees? This is such important work you are doing Paul Stamets. Thank you for your brilliance, humility and constant search for Nature’s secrets, to benefit us all. The short film clip you showed at the end was also stunning.

  3. Thank you for ‘connecting the dots’, sharing your discoveries and inspiring others. Can’t wait to see the entire video when it’s done!

  4. Brilliant work! We look forward to this information going mainstream…. Will MYCOHONEY be made available to beekeepers?

    1. @Kieth Knight, plant birch and willow trees sounds like a good idea and @Christine, http://www.fungi.net is his website and you can easily look up Garden Giant outdoor mushroom kit which is the type he said he was growing when he noticed the bees.

  5. I am excited to learn of this new angle of research. Bees and fungi both are so important to our existence. This post link was added to my Reconnect to Nature page under the headlines index near the bottom of the page.

    1. I’ve spread mulch over my entire garden every year for years. I have bees and spread it thickly under and around their hives, every now and then all sorts of mushrooms spring up as well as the white matrix talked about in the video. I have very healthy prolific bees!

  6. I love this idea and discovery. I am a beekeeper and would love to learn more about this, and would buy these videos as i believe them to be extremely important and would like to become more active in this mission.

  7. I am so grateful to Paul Stamets for his perseverance in his life’s work. This is so exciting. I will take this knowledge and use it in my garden. The video was beautiful, very well done.

  8. I wonder how this matches with the deep floor approach with the deep floor filled with wood chip. If you have the right kind of wood chip it should attract the right sort of fungi.

    Also goes to show that there is always more to learn in this world.

  9. I would love to better understand how I can start some sort of been support system in my community. Thank you!!

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