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An updated chart of basic companion plants we’ve grown successfully over the years

We recently received an e-mail from a gentleman in China looking for…

… what plants you may have in your garden that you can transplant next to your rose or your apple tree to see how they nurture each other over time.

As a result I thought I would post our own updated list of companion plants for him and anyone else interested. While I would love to say this plant or that plant are "best" I feel I must remind folks to keep in mind your climate, soil and many, many other factors that determine how well these plants cooperate together. Trial and error is the best choice to begin companion planting but the chart below should lead you in the right direction….

What is Companion Planting? A gardening method which makes use of the synergistic properties found in nature: cooperation between plants to achieve optimum health and viability.

P = Perennial plant in our Mediterranean climate

Vegetable/Herb

Likes

Dislikes

Anise

Coriander

Basil, rue

Asparagus  (P)

Tomato, parsley, basil

Basil

Tomato, sweet peppers

Rue, anise

Beans

Beets, carrots, cauliflower, celeriac, celery, corn, cucumber, marigolds, potatoes, strawberry, summer savory

Onion, garlic, gladiolus, fennel

Beets

Onion, kohlrabi, bush beans, lettuce, cabbage family

Pole beans, mustards

Borage

Strawberry, fruit trees

Cabbage Family (broccoli, kale, cauliflower, collards, cabbages etc.)

Aromatic herbs, hyssop, thyme, wormwood, potatoes, celery, dill, chamomile, beets, onion, sage, peppermint, rosemary, oregano

Strawberry, tomato, beans, mustards, pole beans

Calendula  (P)

Garden tonic, nutrient accumulator, chard, radish, carrots, tomatoes, thyme, parsley

Carrots

Peas, lettuce, chives, onions, leeks, rosemary, sage, tomato, wormwood, parsley

Dill

Celeriac

Scarlet runner beans

Celery

Leek, tomato, bush beans, cauliflower, cabbage

Chard

Roots crops, lettuce, radish, celery, mint

 
 

 

 

Chayote (Sechium edule)

Cucumbers, Pumpkin, peppers, squash, corn

celery, mint, or snap beans

Chives  (P)

Carrots, apple orchards

Peas, beans

Collards

Tomatoes

Comfrey  (P)

Nutrient accumulator/mulch

Coriander/Cilantro

Anise, carrots, radish, chard

Fennel

Corn

Potato, peas, beans, cucumbers, pumpkin, squash, melons, marigolds, sunflowers, sunchokes

Cucumbers

Beans, corn, peas, radish, sunflowers, okra

Potato, aromatic herbs

Eggplant

Beans, okra

Fennel

Most annuals DO NOT like it

Coriander, wormwood

Garlic

Drip line of fruit trees, roses, tomatoes

Peas and beans

Horseradish  (P)

Fruit trees, potatoes

 
 

 

 

Jerusalem Artichokes (Sunchokes) (P)

Corn

 
 

 

 

Lavender  (P)

Broccoli and cabbage family

 
 

 

 

Leek

Onions, celery, carrots

Lettuce

Carrots, radish, strawberry, cucumber

Celery, cabbage, cress, parsley

Melon

Corn, sunflowers, morning glory, okra

Potatoes

Mint  (P)

Cabbage, tomatoes, nettles

Chamomile

Nettle

Increases oil content of most herbs

Okra

Melons, cucumbers, sweet peppers, eggplant

 
 

 

 

Onion and garlic

Beets, strawberry, tomato, lettuce, summer savory, chamomile, roses

Peas, beans

Parsley

Tomato, asparagus, roses, carrots

Peas

Carrots, turnips, radish, cucumber, corn, beans, potatoes, aromatic herbs

Onions, garlic, gladiolus

Peppers –sweet

Basil, okra

Potato

Beans, corn, cabbage, horseradish, marigold, eggplant

Pumpkin, squash, cucumber, sunflower, tomato, raspberry

Pumpkin

Datura, corn, pole beans,

Potato

Radish

Peas, nasturtium, lettuce, cucumber, beets, spinach, carrots, squash, melons, tomatoes, beans

Potato, hyssop

Rhubarb  (P)

Columbines

Rue  (P)

Roses, raspberries, fig trees

Basil

Sage  (P)

Rosemary, cabbages, carrots,

Cucumbers

Savory –both  (P)

Onions, beans

Cucumbers

Spinach

Strawberries, other greens

Squash

Nasturtium, corn, clover

Strawberries  (P)

Beans, spinach, borage, lettuce

Cabbage

Sunflower

Cucumber

Potato

Sweet potato

White Hellebore

Tomato

Chives, onion, parsley, asparagus, marigold, nasturtium, carrot, garlic, roses, bee balm

Kohlrabi, potato, fennel, cabbage, corn

Turnip

Peas, vetch

 
 

 

 

Valerian  (P)

Calendula, echinacea

 
 

 

 

Sweet woodruff  (P)

Orchards

 
 

 

 

Watermelon

Potatoes mulched with straw*

*generally melons do not like potatoes

Fruit trees  (P)

Chives, garlic, carrots, bulbs, borage, strawberries, nasturtiums, comfrey, plantain, columbine, daylilies

Bare soil

Above is a basic chart of companion plants; I’m sure there is a more expansive list out there.  This is simply a chart of plants we’ve been successful growing together — or not — over the years.  The plants are listed by the plants they like, the ones they don’t and also if they are a perennial (otherwise they are an annual or biannual in this Mediterranean climate).

I’m also working on a Plant Guild Matrix or species matrix chart which details various plants, their unique characteristics as well as their specific use and ecological function.  This type of chart easily organizes the mind when designing a plant guild and forest garden — which is a different way of thinking about species cooperation as compared to companion planting.  Plant guilds are composed of a central species — like an apple tree — surrounded by nurturing plant species and occasional animal disturbance.  In essence companion planting is one aspect to consider when designing a plant guild.

5 Responses to “Companion Planting Information and Chart”

  1. Robert Knops (Netherland)

    It would be interesting to make more of these for every climate. Wild plants could also be integraded, because they also give al lot of beneficials.

    Reply
  2. Rose W

    I’m so happy to find this website and companion planting chart online. My East Texas garden is already growing very nicely and this companion planting chart has been a great guideline to me. I appeared to have a very happy garden and very much appreciate all the great advice. Thanks so much!

    Reply

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