The Lone Green Warrior – Updated

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How one man transformed an isolated, barren sandbar in northeastern India into a lush, wildlife sanctuary.

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From Yacon to Pumpkin

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The Yacon has been harvested and processed into Yacon Syrup. Now the bed needs to be re-established , but to grow what? Yacon is a root crop so ideally growing something that is not a root vegetable is preferred. Well, the choice is pumpkins because it is also time to start a new patch for them. With our climate pumpkins will just keep growing all year around only slowing down […]

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Dryland Harvesting Home Hacks Sun, Rain, Food & Surroundings

Dryland Harvesting Home Hacks Sun, Rain, Food & Surroundings

When Brad Lancaster and his brother bought their home in downtown Tucson, the streetscape was a dusty place, devoid of trees or any vegetation. In 1996 Lancaster and his neighbors started an annual tree planting project, which up till now has resulted in over 1,400 native food-bearing trees being planted (usually with water-harvesting earthworks) in the neighborhood. In 2004, Lancaster augmented the street tree planting by using a 14-inch, gas […]

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The Oldest Forest Garden

The Oldest Forest Garden

Small is not just possible, small is inevitable. Creating autonomous control of our economics requires people to be creative – and that means within the resources available. Graham Bell asks, where better to start than a forest garden?

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Biochar: Helps Increase Crop Yields and Mitigates Climate Change

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Whenever we hear the word biochar, most of us are thinking that this is not a climate-friendly method since it undergoes combustion process and can aggravate greenhouse effect. Though this is a thousand years old industrial technology technique for soil enhancer, some are still confused if it’s the real deal. Is it, in fact, a too good to be true method for agriculture? What is Biochar? Biochar is a soil […]

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Vermicomposting: How Worms Can Reduce Our Waste

Vermicomposting: How Worms Can Reduce Our Waste

Nearly one third of our food ends up in the trash can. There is hope, however, in the form of worms, which naturally convert organic waste into fertilizer. In this very well illustrated video, Matthew Ross details the steps we can all take to vermicompost at home — and why it makes good business sense to do so. Video Courtesy of Ted Ed For a great article about setting up […]

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Guilds for the Small Scale Home Garden

A Mixed Bunch

Building guilds is a clever way to put gardens together. Instead of toiling over providing this or that nutrient for plants or battling with pests or relying on the success of just one crop to provide the food, a massive mixture of productive growth is but a few preparation steps away. We often talk about guilds as a grand scheme, part of growing a food forest, starting with something huge […]

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Fomes Fomentarius in the French Alps and Paul Stamets

Fomes Fomentarius in the French Alps and Paul Stamets

Mushrooms and other fungi types already share a long history with us humans. For example, Hippocrates said sometime around 450 BCE that the amadou mushroom (Fomes fomentarius) was used for cauterizing wounds. The present day: Ongoing fungi studies Fast forward to the present day, the amadou mushroom and other fungi species are attracting more attention. That’s because they find many applications in agriculture, pest control, environmental sustainability, and even in […]

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Another Way of Learning

Opened hardback book diary, fanned pages on blurred nature lands

After thirty years of engagement with Permaculture, it never ceases to amaze me how the Permaculture Design Course (PDC) changes peoples’ lives. This brilliant understanding of how to meet peoples’ needs, without working so hard, and at the same time learning to minimise waste was crafted by Bill Mollison and David Holmgren before I came along to connect with it. I’m also hugely aware that it has always been a […]

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Small Scale Farming

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Incremental change is hard to see. Almost 2 years in and we are just starting to see the vision take shape of what we want to accomplish. There is still a ways to go, but to see how far we’ve come gives us the motivation to keep going. What is nice about small scale farming is the equal part vision and equal part execution (since it is small scale there […]

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Urban Permaculture Transformation in Michigan

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by Rachelle Yeaman and Michael Hoag. Despite being the creators and beneficiaries of the Lillie House urban permaculture site, Mike Hoag and Kim Willis are still a little amazed by all the yields they’re reaping from their property. In four years of striving to harness the power of natural systems, they’ve gone from a scraggly, compacted lawn that took thankless hours to maintain, to a low-maintenance, edible paradise. Lillie House […]

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Then and Now: A Baby Boomer Growing Up

Then and Now: A Baby Boomer Growing Up

World War II caused three major economic disruptions in Europe. The military commandeered a large part of the active workforce, governments redirected social spend to the war effort, and aerial bombing devastated many urban areas. The surviving soldiers returned to a society they hardly knew. The situation was different for military returning to the U.S. where the war economy had blossomed. Two hundred billion in war bonds matured, financing the […]

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